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Overwintering a hosta in a container?

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by evepet on September 11, 2006 12:22 AM
I had a big hosta that was growing too large for it's original spot in the garden, and in the process of 'rearranging' things a couple of weeks ago, I decided to transplant this hosta into a big plastic container. It's doing quite well so far (still outdoors of course). I'd like to overwinter it in the container. I think I read how somebody put a 'containered' hosta in their unheated garage during the winter months and had it survive. Has anyone any experience with this situation? (I know I could bury the pot outside, etc., but I don't have any space available to do that). All comments welcome. [grin]
by kennyso on September 11, 2006 09:15 AM
If it gets too big I'll always be happy to take a small divided portion off your hands...just joking! Have you considered dividing your hosta and giving away maybe half of it to like achurch of library? That way, you'll have a smaller plant and it should maybe save you the trouble of keeping it in a container. Sorry, but I don't have a hosta so I've never had any exprience with them before.

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by slredmond on September 11, 2006 06:42 PM
Eve - I have this same question. I have at least 20 in containers I need to deal with! We're moving to a new house, and I don't want to leave a lot of my hostas behind. Hope someone answers!

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Sandy R.
by patches1414 on September 11, 2006 06:59 PM
Evepet, whenever my hostas get too big I always divide them. I just did that a few weeks ago and potted them up and gave a few away. The ones I kept I put in the ground, pot and all, for the winter because I really didn't have anyplace to put them at the moment. [dunno] I've done this before and it worked great! [thumb] Personally, I wouldn't put them in my garage because I would be afraid they wouldn't get enough light! [Frown]

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by evepet on September 11, 2006 11:17 PM
Thanks to you all for responding. I know that I could divide the plant, and give some of it away... I probably should have done that when I moved it a couple of weeks ago. I don't really want it in my flowerbed any more - I have two others as well - and it was taking up space that I want now for some other perennials that (hopefully!) will provide a shot of colour next year. I could move it to my front flowerbed, but it's full-sun practically all day long and I don't think a hosta would do well there. Even sun-loving perennials had a difficult time there this past summer. I know I read about this 'store in garage over winter' business somewhere...I recall someone saying they'd done that successfully, but they may have been in a different gardening zone that I am. I've been reading a lot of stuff re gardening over the past few months, and now I can't recall where these 'tidbits' came from. Regarding lack of light in the garage...would it be that much of a problem when the plant is dormant over the winter? Does that much light penetrate through snow cover, etc. during the winter months? (I don't know - I'm just wondering out loud at this point).
by debnoel on September 16, 2006 11:33 AM
I had a phlox and daylily that never got in the ground last year. I put them next to the house in a bit of a sheltered area and they survived and are now in the ground. That was not the first time I did not get things in the ground and they had to spend the winter in a pot next to the house.
by slredmond on September 16, 2006 06:39 PM
Hi debnoel -
What zone are you in? I've even had annuals come up the following year planted next to the south side of my house. I'm just concerned that the roots in the container plants would so elevated they would freeze. I think that's what I'll try, though, to put them along side the south wall with straw bales beside them.

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Sandy R.

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