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Overwintering tomato plant in container?

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
by badplanter on September 02, 2006 04:54 AM
Is it at all possible to overwinter a tomato plant in a container?
I had trouble with animals eating my tomatoes earlier in the year, and the seeds from these half-eaten tomatoes have begun to sprout in the garden. Can i save them, or do i just have to let the little sprouts die?
If i CAN save them, how do i care for it?

Any suggestions would be very helpful.

Thanks! [thumb]

(zone 6, in case you need that info.)

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 -  - "I don't want no more of army life, gee mom, I wanna go, but they won't let me go, gee mom, I wanna go home!" My PB!
by markr on September 02, 2006 05:14 AM
If you can keep them indoors and supply heat and light then i cant see no problem!

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Mark
by badplanter on September 02, 2006 02:12 PM
Thanks other Mark!
It's worth a shot!

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 -  - "I don't want no more of army life, gee mom, I wanna go, but they won't let me go, gee mom, I wanna go home!" My PB!
by Patty S on September 02, 2006 02:44 PM
Mark, I tried that last year... no dice.  -
It was warm enough in the house, but tomato plants need a whole lot of sun, so it just gradually withered away & died off.

I did put my pepper plants into containers & bring them in, & they did just fine in a sunny window. (A little slower maybe, & I had to pollinate the blossoms with a Q-tip.) I did a really dumb thing though, & sat the containers out on the deck too soon, in the the spring. They DON'T like cool weather, & I lost them, after babying them all winter! [Frown]

I'll know better, next year.

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by papito on September 02, 2006 05:08 PM
check this out:
http://warren.osu.edu/ag/hort.htm

quote:
Do you hate to see your vegetable plants get killed by freezing weather in the fall? Well, if you have adjustable "grow-lights" in your basement, you can have some fun by bringing in and overwintering 2 or 3 potted tomato plants. They will produce again next year! Be sure to spray them outside with insecticide and fungicide before bringing inside for the winter, or they'll be overcome by aphids, spider mites, etc... When you see them flower under the lights, vibrate the stems by shaking them with your hand. This will pollinate the flowers. Cherry or plum-type tomatoes will set a few fruits and start ripening by February or March! The plants can be set outside next spring for another full season of production! Be sure to fertilize the plants if lower leaves turn yellow.


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Amor est vitae essentia.
Love is the essence of life.
by Patty S on September 02, 2006 06:02 PM
Papito, [flower] the ever resourceful garden guy! [flower]
You always pop in with the best info! [kissies] That Ohio State University Extension site sure has put a lot of good tips together... don't forget that we have a great section right here too, with Monthly Gardening Tasks And Projects! [thumb] (Thanks, Bill!)

I have a couple 2' full spectrum flourescent grow lights, besides a 4' one, so I think I just might try that out with my up-side down tomatoes, as well as one of my smaller cherry tomato plants!

By the way, Papito, we're coming down to watch a game in October, & will arrive on the 3rd Saturday. I hope we can get together over a cup of coffee this year... & I have an Anthurium with your name on it, that I plan to bring along! [clappy]

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