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Starting Hibiscus from seeds......

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
by fall on February 06, 2006 11:37 AM
I am looking for some info on how to start hibiscus from seeds. Can someone help me? [dunno]

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by alankhart on February 07, 2006 01:06 AM
Seeds can be planted in a commercial seed starting medium or a mix can be made out of some combination of sand, perlite, vermiculite and Canadian peat. The seeds are planted 1/4 to 1/2" deep in the mixture and should germinate in a week to a month on average. It is best to keep the temperature about 75 - 80F degrees and the medium damp, but not soggy. Until you have found out what works best for you, the seed starting kits that are available in gardening stores and catalogs that use small plastic cells may be the best way to start -- one seed per cell.. Some have used styrofoam coffee cups with drainage holes poked in the bottoms and 100% perlite to start their seedlings. Some plant several seeds in 4" pots. Others use trays with clear domes and germinate the seeds inside under lights.

After the seedlings have developed several sets of true leaves and the stems have begun to harden and become woody, they may be moved to a larger pot. A water soluble 20-20-20 fertilizer can be used per label directions at this point. Some growers will move these 3 or 4" tall seedlings to a gallon plastic pot containing potting soil, others will move their seedlings up in several stages to gallon pots and use soilless mixtures. Some growers plant their young seedlings in the ground in their own bed. (Always avoid disrupting the plant and its roots as much as possible in these moves.) These small seedlings should be gradually introduced to sun over several days. Remember they are tender, so avoid temperatures in the 40s.

Eventually, after anywhere from 6 to 18 months, your seedlings will begin to bloom.

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by dodge on February 07, 2006 02:32 AM
100% correct Alan,,,,,,

Just put them out when you do spring sowing.. Ours is end of may......I have mine in full sun in both beds.....

Some did flower the first year.. Not all.. They are lovely.. Drawback......(The bloom doesnt last long)..
Good luck.
[flower] [flower] [flower]
Dodge

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''''Those who live in the Lord Never See Each Other For The Last Time!''''
by njoynit on February 07, 2006 04:23 AM
I winter sow some of mine& some I'll start in pots in the window.I'm actually doing that today.I decided this year to use the peat pellets and sow 2 seeds per pellet and when they are up then will sow the peat pot into a foam soup cup that has holes for drainage.I'm SE TX 8b.I've heard of whitney Tx,but too lazy to find map and see where ya are.I was just checking some seed depths......

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by Safari Barbie on February 07, 2006 09:49 AM
What kind of hibiscus seed do you have?
Tropical hibiscus, Hibiscus moscheutus (Dixie), Texas Star?
All the advise is great for most kinds, but if you have tropical, they can be trickier to start. Also they're the ones that need warmer temps to germinate.
Do you know what species you have?
Barb

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Barb
Southern coastal North Carolina
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by MissJamie on February 07, 2006 10:50 AM
sorry to hijack this topic but I was wondering...are hibiscus perennial? I have mostly hardy hibiscus seeds? we get freezes here in the fall/winter so would we need to bring them in before it gets to cold?

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by alankhart on February 07, 2006 10:38 PM
MissJamie,
There is the tropical hibiscus, which is not perennial and would need to be brought indoors for cold winters , and there is the perennial kind that dies down to the ground in cold winter areas and comes back from the roots.

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by dodge on February 08, 2006 03:17 AM
MISS JAMIE,

[Eek!]
Nice to be Hijacked on seeds..ha hah
Some hibiscus are hardy and some not.. I am zone 6 with snow and ice and hail.........
My Hibiscus are out there, and still green around the stems......
[Love]
have a nice time with your Hibbies.
[kitty]
dodge

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''''Those who live in the Lord Never See Each Other For The Last Time!''''
by MissJamie on February 08, 2006 05:33 AM
oh ok thanks ya'll!

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*~*Last night I played a blank tape at full blast. The mime next door went nuts.
*~* http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=2125497034
by patches1414 on February 14, 2006 03:18 PM
Hi Miss Jamie,

I am in Zone 5. I have hardy hibiscus and they always survive our winters here in Illinois. This is what worked for me on my hardy Hibiscus seeds. I scarified (nicked) the seeds and soaked them in hot water for 1 hour to make it easier for moisture to enter. I kept the seed tray under grow lights where the temperature was about 70-80 degrees F. You need only to scrape the seed to break the surface to get a good result. You can use a small file, sandpaper or fingernail clippers (my preference) to nick the coating of the seed. Be careful not to nick the seed too deep near the site of the embryo because this would make the seed not viable. Germination should take between 10-30 days. I hope this helps.

patches1414

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