Hummingbird House The Garden Helper
No-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web since 1997
vine bar
Wild Willy
 

Plants for cuttings????

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2004
by Lilylilac on July 13, 2004 11:44 PM
I'm interested in starting some perennials and/or shrubs by using cuttings. I'm in Zone 5. What kinds of plants are the the easiest to start?

Also, any helpful hints would help me out.

Thanks! [flower]

* * * *
 -

zone 5
by alankhart on July 14, 2004 12:20 AM
I have found that most salvias are easy to grow from cuttings as well as Butterfly Bushes and Hydrangeas. I believe chrysanthemums are also supposed to be easy.

* * * *
 -
 -
 -
by gardenmom32210 on July 14, 2004 03:30 AM
Alot of plants can be started from cuttings,lantana,geranium,begonias,jasmine,honeysuckle and moss rose,to name a few. I highly recommend that you use a rooting hormone on all cuttings that you want to root. Sometimes it takes a little while for it to start,but as long as its still got green,it should be fine.
(but then again,yesterday when I was adding "yard waste" to my pile I spotted some new green and it turned out to be a cutting I threw away 5-6 months ago,because I KNEW it was dead! Go Figure?)

Karen [grin]
by Lilylilac on July 14, 2004 06:08 AM
I just "found" a cutting from a really beautiful hardy blue hibiscus this afternoon and brought it home. I trimmed it, dipped it in horomone, planted and watered it. I then covered it in plastic. It looks terrible and wilted. How hard are hibiscus to start from cuttings? Is there any hope for it?

* * * *
 -

zone 5
by obywan59 on July 14, 2004 02:36 PM
Yes, there is hope. Summer is the time to take cuttings from hibiscus. Remove the flower buds and cut the leaves back by half to reduce water loss.

* * * *
 -
Terry

May the force be with you
by Back Mountain NEPA on July 14, 2004 10:49 PM
While this isn't necessarily under the "cuttings" topic, it's close. Don't forget that the easiest way to start new plants from shrubs is often to simply place a rock over a low twig and let it form its own roots. Then, cut it from the parent when ready. This only applies if it's a plant you already own, but it is easy to expand your azaleas, rhododendrons, forsythia, etc, this way. In fact, the plant may already have started its own babies already. Saves the work of watching over cuttings. I'm still experimenting with other types of plants. Certain roses can succeed this way, too.
by frustratedattimes on July 15, 2004 03:38 AM
Hey everyone, Back Mtn has a valid point there. I have 5 snowball bushes (started with 1) found out quite by accident that I could get new plants by simple covering part of a low limb with mulch, or a rock, anything to keep it down to the ground. Each time I do by late winter I have another snowball bush started. I am going to experiment with my crepe myrtles this way also.

Hope this helps some.

* * * *
I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them." John Wayne
http://community.webshots.com/user/johncandy1005
by Lilylilac on July 15, 2004 04:51 AM
That is an excellent idea too. I had not thought of that! I'm in Zone 5. It's probably too late to start something like that now isn't it?

* * * *
 -

zone 5
by frustratedattimes on July 15, 2004 05:01 AM
I would give it a shot now, what do you have to lose, and everything to gain from it. By early spring you could have new plants [muggs]

* * * *
I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them." John Wayne
http://community.webshots.com/user/johncandy1005
by Lilylilac on July 15, 2004 06:24 AM
Ok, I'll give it a shot. I've got some lilac bushes and some Rose of Sharon's. Will this process work with them? [dunno]

Also, my Old Fashioned Bleeding Hearts are just now starting to fall asleep for the winter. They're still quite healthy and green. Is it possible to start some cuttings with them? And how should I go about it?

* * * *
 -

zone 5
by Back Mountain NEPA on July 21, 2004 07:55 PM
Definitely works with lilacs, and butterfly bushes too. Rose of Sharon generally self-seeds very generously all by itself, so you should have tons of little ones next to your original.
by Nan D on July 22, 2004 03:13 PM
Can you take cuttings of Sweet Potato vine? I have a beautiful one I would like to keep a start of for next year.
Thanks for any advice! [wayey]

* * * *
Nan
http://community.webshots.com/user/nan1065
by Nan D on July 22, 2004 03:33 PM
Can you take cuttings of Sweet Potato vine? I have a beautiful one I would like to keep a start of for next year.
Thanks for any advice! [wayey]

* * * *
Nan
http://community.webshots.com/user/nan1065
by frustratedattimes on July 24, 2004 09:21 PM
Sorry do not know about the Sweet Potato Vine. But give it a try.

I just was informed of a way to start woody cuttings. Maybe this is an old way, and I am just slow.

I was told to push the woody stem you want to start into a potato and then plant it.

I wonder how the potato helps? Anybody answer that??????

* * * *
I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them." John Wayne
http://community.webshots.com/user/johncandy1005

Active Garden Forum

Other articles you might like: