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Plants for absorbing the most H2O ?

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2004
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by Word34 on May 12, 2004 07:30 AM
Hello
I recently bought a house that rests on a plateau in a hillside. If you look out the front door, your facing the down-slope. If you look out the back of the house, your facing the up-slope. The funny thing is, there is only 2 plants in my 10,000 square foot yard. A big bush that rests against the front side of the house and a lonely rose bush in the rear corner . My problem is that my back yard is like a four-year-old with a supersoaker i.e., ALL WET. I plan to combat this problem at several angles. I have the drainage and re-grading issues dealt with. I now need some advice on the best bushes or plants to put around the perimeter of the house. I guess the plants that absorb the most water are what I'm looking for here. The rear of the house receives an abundance of sun. Any help on this spongy problem would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks everyone!
by loz on May 12, 2004 01:41 PM
Hi Word34!! [wayey] I have a section in my gardening book here that lists plants to use for poorly drained/wet sites.....

Shrubs--red chokeberry, purple beautyberry, sweet shrub, buttonbush, summer-sweet, leatherwood, winterberry
Deciduous trees--box elder, red maple, silver maple, hackberry, sycamore, white oak, golden weeping willow, american elm.
Everygreens--atlantic white cedar, inkberry, slash pine, bald cypress

I also pulled up a link to a list of perennials that prefer wet soil......

perennials

Hope this helps....just make sure whatever you buy is good for your zone!!!!! [wayey]
by hisgal2 on May 12, 2004 04:39 PM
I just planted a whole mess of things on the one side of our house because alot of water sits there. But although it is the south side of the house, because of two massive trees, it gets shade almost all day long so I went with shady plants....ferns, bleeding hearts, lilies of the valley, hostas, tiger lilies. I'm not sure how these plants to in the sun. A neighbor down the street has a gorgeous bleeding heart and its in full sun, so I'm guessing that those will do ok?? [dunno]

Bye the way...welcome to the forum!!! [wayey] [wayey]

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by loz on May 12, 2004 06:19 PM
There actually is a bleeding heart that can take full sun.....when I was in my local nursery and bought my shade loving bleeding heart she asked me if I wanted one for sun also because there is a variety that can handle full sun......Very nice plants.....I'm enjoying mine..... [thumb]
by Word34 on May 12, 2004 06:40 PM
Thank you both for your input. These Ideas are exactly what I was looking for. I am delighted to have found this site and look forward to sharing any info I may have. As little as it may be! Ha Ha
by hisgal2 on May 12, 2004 08:12 PM
Hey Word,

Where in PA are ya? I'm in Temple....about 45 min to an hour away from Philly.

Oh....and do you have any ties your looking to get rid of?????? [Smile] See the Hobbies and Crafts section to understand the insanity. [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [nutz]

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by sibyl on June 08, 2004 07:23 AM
right in front of my porch is like a swamp land! i gotta silver maple out there, but theres plenty of water for more! thanks for that list Loz [thumb] im gonna check out some of those shrubs & see whats good in my zone , im getting tierd of the mud, my hubby was just talking bout putting a bigger porch on [grin] ya know what that means!the more the porch, the more ya can plant around it! [Big Grin] [grin] and im getting me some water lovin plants!

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by Eugene Carroll on June 12, 2004 05:27 PM
Try "Winterberry" (alternately referred to as "Michigan Holly" or "Coralberry")

WInterberry will grow well in very wet areas and there are some spectacular cultivars available.

As for your back yard, if there is a low wet area, consider a sycamore tree. Plant it on a small mound to give the roots time to adapt to the water. These trees get quite large, rather quickly, and will pump lots of water out of the lawn.
by Annette on June 14, 2004 07:19 AM
Another good tree for wet areas is the water (or live) oak. They will suck up vast amount of water, and are beautiful when full grown!
by sibyl on June 15, 2004 06:36 AM
i just got a hydrangea!! and also found out i have a pussy willow, [Big Grin] [ my brother works for a landscaper & hes always taking home half dead plants his boss throws away & tries to bring em back to life ] my brother was at my house today & i told him that tree he gave me was doing better since i moved it, & he said "the pussy willow" [shocked] [grin] [Big Grin] i have a pussy willow?! [Wink] no wonder it was doing better! i had it in my back yard, & i moved it in the middle [were all the water lays] [thumb]

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