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plants for windbreak

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2004
by Jon on May 11, 2004 02:27 PM
Hi. I'm getting to the point of putting in plants (probably mesquite since is a "no-care bush/tree" here) to grow a good windbreak. Question - - how far can the windbreak be and still be effective?

The winds predominately gust from either the north or the south (occasionally swirling but usually one direction or the other). On the north side is not a problem - - can plant fairly close - - but I'm hoping for as much distance as possible on the south side. I have the yard divided up - - foodstuffs (fruit trees, berries, grapes, etc.) on the north side of the walkway - flowers, succulents on the south side - and somewhat central is the trees that will hopefully start giving more shade to the house. I lose a lot of fruit because of the wind gusts which can be quite strong (busted the back window in my car today - - and other times I've had to chase down the garbage can - - - - we like to refer to it as "real estate relocation services for free" (smile).

I'd rather be able to put the windbreak in on the far south side of the property - - if it will do the job of protecting the fruit on the trees. North to south is about 350 - 375 feet.

Also -- any other suggestions for good "desert" (easy-care - - - drought tolerant plants) that are good windbreak would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Jon
by papito on May 11, 2004 06:41 PM
Jon,

on windbreaks:

1. Broussonetia papyrifera- takes stony, sterile, alkaline soil, strong winds, desert heat. moderate growth to 50 ft. tall, 40 ft. across.

Full Sun.
No watering once established.

Paper Mulberry

2. Maclura pomefera

to 60 feet tall. similar growing conditions as Paper Mulberry. Full sun, No watering once established.

Osage Orange

3. And, Prosopsis, as you have already mentioned.
Here's some info on P. glandulosa:

Honey Mesquite

Windbreaks provide protection for up to 5 times their height. Turbulence is greatest just behind the windreak (about 10 ft.) and gradually diminish in the next 50 ft. or so.

Ever thought of erecting "windmill" to generate your own electricity or to bring water up from the water table?

Papito

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Amor est vitae essentia.
Love is the essence of life.
by Jon on May 19, 2004 02:54 PM
Papito,

Thank you for the response and websites.

Was out to Pasadena and Temeculah this weekend for my kid brother's graduation from med school last Friday. Boy was my aunt drooling over a tree that we somehow had never really paid attention to - - "jacaranda". We were maveling that here we (mom, Jenette, Jerry and I) had grown up in the area - and yet somehow missed the beauty of the tree. Now Jenette wants me to locate and plant in her yard. Oh well - - at least you and others in So CA can enjoy.

Have not given any thought - at least not until you mentioned it - to building and employing a windmill. Will be giving some thought to it in the next year. Right now - still getting basic landscaping done. Thanks for the idea - - will definitely investigate, especially with the price of electricity.

Jon
by weezie13 on May 19, 2004 07:11 PM
Jon,
I had posted that as one of my most favorited trees', I came acrossed the picture while hunting thru the internet and wanted to grab it thru my screen..
So beauuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuutiful!!!!
jacaranda mimosifolia
But it's for the warmer sections.....

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by gardengal on May 19, 2004 10:37 PM
I just bought a jacaranda baby this weekend at my sister's youth fair at her school. I love those trees, always have. I finally convinced my hubby that it would be the perfect accent to the front yard. One of my favorite streets is Jacaranda Dr. in Fullerton, Ca. Its so named, obviously, because of the huge jacarandas that line the street, they just about touch in the middle. Right now they are all in bloom, absolutley amazing, a little messy, but just gorgeous. [grin]

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Women and cats will do as they please. Men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
by weezie13 on May 19, 2004 10:50 PM
Wish we had a picture of that!!!!! [thumb] [flower]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by papito on June 02, 2004 04:54 PM
Another suggestion:

ZIZIPHUS jujuba (Chinese jujube).

(Western Garden Book, May 1999, page 528.)

Slow to moderate growth, 20'-30'. Spiny, gnarled branches, glossy bright green leaves 1"-2" long. Clusters of small yellowish flowers in May-June; shiny, reddish brown, datelike fruit in fall has sweet, applelike flavor; candied and dried fruits resemble dates.

The tree is deep rooted and takes well to desert conditions, tolerating drought, saline and alkaline soils.

Two cultivated varieties are "Lang" [1-1/2"-2" long fruit] and "Li" [2" long fruit].

Western Garden Book Zones 7-16, 18-24.

For additional info, see Jujuba
The Arboretum at Arizona State University

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Amor est vitae essentia.
Love is the essence of life.

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