Hummingbird House The Garden Helper
No-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web since 1997
vine bar
Wild Willy
 

How much H2O is too much H2O?

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
« Prev thread: How much Epsom?| Next thread: How much shade can Lillies tolerate? »
Back to Thread index
by Russ on March 14, 2005 11:50 PM
I have just finished my garden and have installed 250 feet of misting irrigation (misterlandscaper.com from Lowes). It is great but I am curious as to how much is too much. I noticed my recently planted annuals were beginning to wilt at every other day but my soil is very moist even though. I have about 3" of mulch and a great soil mix. Suggestions?
by weezie13 on March 15, 2005 12:25 AM
Hi [wayey] Russ,
Welcome to The Garden Helper's Forum!!!
We are very glad you found us!!!

Couple of questions....
What type of annuals are they?
What time of day are you watering?

And this is just something I read somewhere's,
can't for the life of me remember, but sometimes
some plants will show you signs of wilting, when
over~watered!!!!

Not exactly sure why [dunno] ... If I ever find where I read it, I'll shed some more light on it for you!!!

That might be the reason, it may not..
Wait for some of the other gardener's to come thru they may also have an explaination too!!!

Weezie

Don't forget to take a peak around and visit all the sections here, there's lot's to do and keep you busy!!!

* * * *
Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

 -
 -
 -

http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Russ on March 15, 2005 12:39 AM
For the life of me I can't remember the annual's name. Nothing fancy, just color. The ones' wilting were at the far ends of the bed where the least amount of spray hit so it most likely is the lack of water. I made those adjustments and they perked right up. However, when I dig in the soil it is moist and cool which makes me wonder where a good medium is. Right now the days are 70 at the hottest but when summer hits that's another story.
by weezie13 on March 15, 2005 01:21 AM
Russ,
Do you have a rain gage or water gage?
I'd get one or two or even three, and do a test..
One on one side, one on the other, one in the middle...... See if you're getting even amounts of watering!!
Just an idea [dunno] [thinker]

Also, is there a slight slope to your flower area, one way or the other, where water may run off to and soak one side more than the other??? [dunno] [thinker]

Also, when you mulch, it's very good!!
It holds in water wonderfully!!!
and maybe if it's too moist hold off a day or too?

Weezie

Got a picture of your annuals???
We have a Mystery Section here!!!
And we [Cool] love a good mystery!!!

* * * *
Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

 -
 -
 -

http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Russ on March 15, 2005 04:18 PM
I thought about a rain gage. I may do that. The beds are built up so there is a slope but I was carefult not to plant many, if any, plants whrere water could puddle allowing for good runoff on the entire bed. These plants are just planted coming form a 4" pot. They may have been just a little weak from the move and needing a good watering. They do seem much better now but I'm still wandering about how much water for the beds. When plant care instrutions mention good drainage what does that translate to?
by weezie13 on March 15, 2005 05:48 PM
Russ,
quote:
When plant care instrutions mention good drainage what does that translate to?
I am not an expert by no means, just from reading books, but a ball park idea is, good drainage is that plants don't sit in water or have constant wet feet.

They should have an airy mixture of topsoil and compost, plants need to have slight bit of air for their roots, room to move and grow into, **not so compact they can't move**
and the compost to hold the moisture and roots can access nutrients from,
but a sandy/loam like that it allows the water to move thru and away from the plant.

Does that explain it okay???

quote:
I thought about a rain gage. I may do that.
Just for sh*ts and giggles, I'd get 3 and try like what I said, one area may not get the same amount, or if in a drafty area *windy* the wind may shift the water somewhere's else, there's wind tunnels you may not know about or realize which could effect the way the water lands. [dunno]

Also, with them wilting, another thing came to mind....when plants are planted and need water on what ever routine they are given, you can effect a plant by the WAY you water...
A plant should be given a good drink of water, and it should be a deep watering..for the most part..
what you want to do is water well, and get the roots to go down, where it's cooler, water is used more efficiently, stays longer, because there's no hot sun beating on it drying it out or windy wind drying it out either...
When you water lightly, (or misting) it forces the roots to grow upwards towards the surface where the sun beats down on it and the wind blows it dry....
Plants like coneflowers, once established are very drought tolerant, because of a very deeeeeep tap root and can survive low water... but if you only water a little bit, and it'll develope roots where the water is, and won't be good for the plant.. and stresses it out!!!

Most annuals aren't really deep rooted like that perennial coneflower, but will develope roots that go down instead of flat and along the ground level.

quote:
These plants are just planted coming form a 4" pot. They may have been just a little weak from the move and needing a good watering.
That may have very well been it, you need to give your plants a good watering all the week or so before you're going to plant, and a soaking in the pots just before planting, so they are filled with water.
Plant them according to directions and have a "quick food" fertilizer (I like Schultz Plus 10~60~10) on hand when transplanting...
cuts down on transplant shock.
Some plants just do not like transplanting.
and because their roots have been disturbed and don't have an adequate food supply yet, their way of handling shock some times is to just shut down, take a nap *they don't want their leaves out flat, to absorb sunshine, because they're under stress and can't handle the process of what they do in the sun... so, they just say, go away for a bit...
The "quick food" is used as a foliar spray or watering onto their LEAVES, and they can absorb it thru there until their root system is again established!!!

Is that too much information???? [shocked] [teacher]

If I didnt' explained something and you didn't quite get it, don't hestitate to say,
"What the [perplexed] heck [dunno] did you say??"

I confuse myself sometimes!!!!
But we'll get you and your plants there!!!

Hope I've helped!!!!

Weezie

* * * *
Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

 -
 -
 -

http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Russ on March 15, 2005 06:07 PM
No, all good stuff. I have picked up some miracle grow fertilizer I plan to spray on the leaves of plants.

Active Garden Forum

« Prev thread: How much Epsom?| Next thread: How much shade can Lillies tolerate? »
Back to Thread index

Other articles you might like: