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tubor/rhizome plants that also develop seeds

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by Patty S on October 02, 2005 01:52 PM
One thing that I dont understand is that I see mention made of some plants having tubors/rhizomes (is there a difference?), yet that same plant develops seed pods! I'm thinking that maybe a plant that develops both is what classifies them as weeds... although I have beautiful Bearded Iris, which have tubor roots (rhizomes?), yet they will occasionally develop pods & I'm sure they're not classified as weeds... (Things that make you go "Hmmm"!) [dunno]

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by tamara on October 02, 2005 08:32 PM
Never really thought of it but my bleeding hearts also develop seeds and I just can't bare to call it a weed. seeds turn into rhizomes I guess. Hey, anyone out there to clear this up. Good question Patty S.

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by mike57 on October 02, 2005 10:42 PM
[wayey] HI Patty S In my opinion plants that develop seeds even the ones with tubers/rhizomes do so to insure that the plants will continue to survive even if the tubers/rhizomes die from the cold weather in some areas.the plant will continue to survive in the form of the seeds.tubers/rhizomes have to be dug up in cold cliamets.as far as seeds go the same applies to trees such as banana trees, walnut,oak.fruit trees.just about all living plants and trees produce seeds.so it is a plant or a tree.there for it is not a weed.a weed that blooms any type of bloom is really a flower but its called a wild flower ITS call a WEED if its not a (DESIRABLE) plant that you would grow in your gardens.hope this helps answer your question.your friend in gardening.mike57 [wayey] [flower] [flower]

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by weezie13 on October 02, 2005 10:44 PM
Even Dahlia's go to seed
and you can start them from seeds..

I found a package of them, I thought,
"What the heck?????" and I had the
most fun with them this summer, got 8 plants
out of 10 seeds...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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by plants 'n pots on October 02, 2005 11:06 PM
I've been collecting seeds from my yellow dwarf cannas this summer, and am anxious to see if I can grow any plants from them next year. I would not classify cannas as weeds...

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by Patty S on October 03, 2005 04:16 AM
I agree, & cringe to think that anyone would call Iris, Bleeding Hearts, Dahlias or Lillies "weeds"! I know that seeds from Iris & Calla Lilly take a very long time to germinate, as I planted both (out of pods) last year & so far they've produced itty-bitty sprouts, which may or may not make flowers next year... Have to wait & see!

Mike57, I love your clarification that weeds are really only WILDFLOWERS... & if they aren't ones that we want in our gardens, we refer to them as WEEDS! (Reminds me of when my husband decided to "weed" my flower bed & pulled up every last Nigella [Love-In-A-Mist] that I'd waited for so long to start sprouting! He didn't know that I'd planted them, so it was my fault I guess, as I'd made the statement that "As a rule of thumb, anything there is MORE of, is surely a weed"! ...But, WHAT was he doing out of the recliner in the first place?!)

The "deer barrier", which I've planted between my yard & the abandoned field next to us, includes Devil's Claw, Nigella, Quenn Anne's Lace, California Poppy & Dill... which many people curse at & rip out if they spot such things in their gardens! I feel ALOT better now, being able to say that I have a "wildflower garden"! Thanx, Mike57!!

Is there a difference between a tuber & a rhizome?

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by Jiffymouse on October 03, 2005 10:41 AM
sort of. tubers are thicker (think sweet potato) and will often thin out (vine like) between each piece. rizomes are more likely to "clump up" (think iris's) and need thinning out. but neither are "bulbs" (think daffodils and glads) which are roundish and have their babies grow "attached" like those of a garlic clove. does that help?
by weezie13 on October 03, 2005 10:48 AM
When I think of those two words,
I think of "Tuber's" as Underground..ie; dahlia's..

And I think of "Rhizome's" as on top of the ground. [dunno] ie; iris's..

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Jiffymouse on October 03, 2005 11:18 AM
weezie, my gramma always told me that tuber and tater were about the same thing [Big Grin] [Big Grin] and the rest, is like you said...
by Patty S on October 03, 2005 03:00 PM
Excellent! Good analogies to remember as well. Thanx heaps! (Now I'm one step closer to knowing everything... have a long way to go though, so don't give up on me!)

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by Jiffymouse on October 03, 2005 10:57 PM
[shocked] know everything? my gramma has forgotten more than i'll ever learn about gardening, so, i know, i'll never know everything!
by Patty S on October 03, 2005 11:26 PM
I agree, we'll probably never know EVERYTHING.... but getting 1 step closer isn't painful, in fact, it's sort of fun, don't you think?! [Wink]

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by Carly on November 15, 2005 11:49 PM
That's enough about 'weeds' . . . weeds are a term used for plants that are growing where you don't want them grow.

Every plant that appears is a gift, even if it's ugly . . . well, I remove those, of course. But it's probably there for a reason.

That's coming from me, of course - a gal who was actually talking to a worm the other day.

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When sorting seeds, do not whistle.
by RugbyHukr on November 16, 2005 12:27 AM
tuber

enlarged tip of a rhizome (underground stem) that stores food. Although much modified in structure, the tuber contains all the usual stem partsóbark, wood, pith, nodes, and internodes. The eyes of a potato tuber are nodes where sprouts appear, and they are arranged in the same spiral pattern characteristic of buds on an aerial stem.

Rhizome

In botany, a rhizome is a usually-underground, horizontal stem of a plant that often sends out roots and shoots from its nodes. They are also referred to as creeping rootstalks, or rootstocks. A stolon is similar to a rhizome, but exists above ground, sprouting from an existing stem.

Many plants have rhizomes that serve to spread the plant by vegetative reproduction. Examples are asparagus and Lily of the valley. The spreading stems of ferns are also called rhizomes.

A tuber is a thickened part of a rhizome that has been enlarged for use as a storage organ. They are typically high in starch. An example is the common potato

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