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Moving Roses

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
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by Mark Lewis on September 18, 2005 07:02 PM
I have a large climbing rose and Honeysuckle over and old rotten arbour. I need to move them to make way for a lawn for the children. Is this possible and when/how should I do it.
I also need to move many smaller roses. Will it apply to these too.
Location is Staffordshire England and we are just starting to experience the frost. Thanks

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Regards, Mark
by mike57 on September 18, 2005 07:48 PM
[wayey] HI Mark welcome to the Gardeners forum.in your (zone) its best move them in the spring.here a link on pruning them before you transplant them also prune them in the spring.
http://www.thegardenhelper.com/pruningroses.htm
heres some information on transplanting them. Roses are best transplanted in late winter or early spring when they are coming out of winter dormancy.But for a successful transplant i have better luck in the spring than in late winter as the ground might be hard to dig and the cold could damage your plants. most roses are sold in the spring so its the best time to plant or transplant them.here is the best way i know of to transplant them.water the plant every day for a few days.then dig the hole where you plan on moving it to approximately 20 to 25 inches wide and 12 to 15 inches deep. Roses like soil that is rich in organic matter so mix generous amounts of organic matter into the soil that you dug out of the planting hole.i would recommend putting on some gloves and then prune back the rose as much as possible.then Dig a circle around the plant about 10 to 12 inches beyond where its drip line was. If you run across any roots cut them off with a pair of hand pruners.Continue to dig down about 15 inches until you can slip your shovel under the plant. Once you have undercut the rose bush you will should be able to remove it easily.When you lift the plant you will find that most of the soil will drop off the roots leaving them exposed.In the hole where your going to plant it make a mound of amended soil spread out the roots and set the plant on the mound. Be sure the mound is tall enough to hold the crown at the same level it was originally planted.then just backfill the hole about halfway with the amended soil and fill it with water.then when that drains add more soil to fill the hole and make a ring of soil around the hole with some of the soil.then flood the area again the ring of soil will help hold the water on the planted rose.after that water soaks in put in the rest of the soil to establish the finish grade.then dress the soil then top that with some good organic mulch.then water once a week till new growth starts growing.hope this helps.your friend in gardening.mike57 [wayey] [flower] [flower]

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by Mark Lewis on September 18, 2005 10:29 PM
Many Thanx Mike for all the information. I am really pleased that I have a chance to save these roses as they have beautiful heads on them. I will let you know how I got on. Thanx again. [thumb]

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Regards, Mark
by mike57 on September 18, 2005 10:57 PM
HI Mark you are very welcome.good luck with your roses.your friend in gardening.mike57

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by Mark Lewis on September 19, 2005 05:45 AM
[Big Grin] Transplanting engines to transplanting roses! I will send you the pictures of the newly transplanted rose blossoms.
A further question though. I really need to tidy up the garden ready for the winter. Can I prune them back at all, as some of the climbers have been left for some years?

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Regards, Mark
by mike57 on September 20, 2005 03:16 AM
HI Mark you could do some light triming but it might do some damage to the plants.if you do any triming on them use a candel and put wax over where you trim them to seal it.when you do any triming on them this late in the year it makes them think there still a lot of growing time.but you can try if you use the candel wax to seal where you prune.good luck with them.your friend in gardening.mike57

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by userjh160 on September 21, 2005 03:32 AM
Wow -- I just learned alot about roses here. I too am going to move mine from one area to another area later. I am going to make an official "rose garden" area around the side of the house. I still need yellow and orange to make it "complete" (or atleast in my book). Then I plan on having miniatures along the front of them so then you have 2 levels of roses to look at. I am soooo excited, but I have to destroy those nandina roots in that area also, so that will keep me busy till winter, I am sure. [thumb]
by Mark Lewis on September 21, 2005 07:20 AM
Hi again, it's good to know my questions answered are helping others. I think we should all post pictures of our transplanted roses, next Summer. I am presuming that they do flower the year of transplant!? [dunno]
Andy, we'll try to refer this topic, save you typing it all out again. [critic]

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Regards, Mark
by mike57 on September 23, 2005 06:22 PM
HI Mark yes they will Bloom the same year of transplant.but it might take awhile until the roots get well established and settle in.your friend in gardening.mike57

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by finchlover on September 26, 2005 05:00 AM
Talking about roses. I know to wait but I have a rose bush that had a Hard winter and looks split in middle it has beautiful blooms and real nice scent. Is there a way to save this bush and transplant It.
by mike57 on September 28, 2005 08:49 AM
[wayey] HI finchlover sorry it took me so long to get back to your question.But if it split and it did not kill it and it has grown ok this year it probably has healed its self.but to be on the safe side you might try giving it some support on each side of the split and put gardening tape or masking tape around the split area this should prevent it from splitting any further.then next spring prune it back and prune just under the split section before you transplant it hope this helps your friend in gardening.mike57 [wayey] [flower] [flower]

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by Daiquiri on November 11, 2005 02:31 AM
I LOVE THIS SITE!

I am a new gardner, I want to know if any one knows if there any truth to Elmers glue being a good sealer for roses?

Thank you!

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Thank you!
Daiquiri
by mike57 on November 11, 2005 10:24 PM
HI Daiquiri I think Elmers glue Would melt off after a rain or two But i have heard of people useing the Elmers wood glue to seal them.since its water proof after it drys.your friend in gardening.mike57

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.

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