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Too Soon To Trim Climbing Roses?

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by Angelfaery on February 07, 2006 05:12 AM
This will be the first full spring that I have lived in my new house and I'm very nervous about taking care of all my new plants! I have two very old climbing roses that have both already started growing their new leaves. We have had a pretty mild winter and recently it has been pretty sunny. So it is too soon for me to start trimming them? They both have some old canes and need to be shaped. Also, when should I start spraying them for mold/pests/etc?

Thanks!
by alankhart on February 07, 2006 10:45 PM
I usually wait and trim mine in early to mid march when I'm sure most of winter is over. I'm in zone 6/7 and winters are usually rather mild. I would start a spraying program as soon as the weather is consistently warmer and continue on a regular basis the entire growing season.

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by obywan59 on February 08, 2006 02:23 PM
I agree. That's usually the recommendation. That way if there is any winter kill, you can remove it as you prune.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by JV on February 08, 2006 06:41 PM
Angelfaery I agree with all the above. But I do trim any dead wood I see anytime as it will take energy from the rest of the plant. I use organic sprays but you need to have a good spray schedule no matter organic or chemical and stick with it.
Jimmy

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by Angelfaery on February 09, 2006 01:04 AM
Thanks for the advice! I will take your advice and wait.

Come on spring..hurry up!! [Big Grin]
by angelblossom on February 09, 2006 09:51 AM
I also have a question I have 2 blaze climbers last spring is when I planted them they were very young less than 1 foot of growth when planted(trained to grow over arch) they grew close to 6-8 feet but only 2-3 branches each tho it did have multiple blooms it didn't grow any more arms than that Today I noticed many rose buds on both blazes we're supposed to have freezing temps here this weekend so in March do I cut them back ?? And how far back and how do I encourage a muliply growth Ive looked them up on net but can't seem to find answers to those particulars Of course that's why I'm asking here [thumb]

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by obywan59 on February 09, 2006 02:25 PM
Looking at the atlas and my big hardiness zone map, it looks like you are in zone 8. Even though you may get freezing temperatures, it probably won't kill all the buds or maybe not any of them. What stage are the buds at? Buds showing no color are hardier than buds showing color and buds that show color but are still tight are hardier than buds that are opening up.

Climbing roses require little pruning, and since yours are so young I would say none at all, except for the removal of any dead wood and perhaps heading back of weak wood. You already have a good first seasons growth of long stems. This is normal. This spring buds along those stems will grow and side branches will form and your roses will start to fill in. Also, you will probably get more long branches generating from the base of the plant. Any pruning you would do now or in March would be cutting off flower buds and potential side branches which would flower in subsequent years.

The exception would be on the small flowering branches from last year that grew off the canes. If you really wanted to, you could cut these small branches back to about 6 inches, but it's not really necessary.

You don't want to make any cuts into strong vigorous canes as this will stimulate strong branching from just below those cuts and you will ruin the shape of your rose.

When canes become very old, you should remove them completely to the base of the plant to stimulate new replacement growth. Generally you do this after you notice a reduction in flowering of an older branch.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by angelblossom on February 10, 2006 09:14 AM
Terry Thank you sooo Much!!Most of the buds are tight but there are a few I can see red. OKay then I won't worry about it [Cool] Sounds like It really takes care of it's self untill it gets older. [thumb]

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by Bestofour on February 11, 2006 02:15 AM
I have a question also. I have 2 lady banks roses on trellis's. Should they be trimmed in March? I'm zone 7.

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by comfrey on February 11, 2006 09:07 AM
I am new to rose care, but I do the same as Jimmy said he does, I remove deadwood anytime I see it on mine, I do that out of habit to keep things looking there best no matter what type of plant it is. I am in zone 6b/7 and I will be waiting until the end of March to trim mine, it was just set out last year and so I will only be pruning a very small amount.

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