Hummingbird House The Garden Helper
No-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web since 1997
vine bar
Wild Willy
 

How do you do Wisteria??

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
by SpringFever on July 16, 2006 02:17 AM
I have heard the best is to layer them in the ground [dunno] The problem is that mine is so tall it does not reach the ground [Razz]

Does anyone know?? Has anyone had any success?
I do have seeds but I know it takes a long time to get them going (up to 15 years for the first flower)

I have tried cuttings as well and they did not work out at all!!
I do have a lot of people that wanted some!

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by Jiffymouse on July 16, 2006 02:41 AM
rita, take some pots with soil in them, set them where the vines will reach, and layer them that way. the wisteria doesn't know what is ground and what is soil in a pot. it's all ground to it!
by SpringFever on July 16, 2006 02:44 AM
Thanks Jiffy I will try ... I am not sure it will reach though.

Maybe if I get some kind of shelf out there!!  -

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by imarose on August 27, 2006 09:31 AM
Jiffy...
I wonder if a Wisteria cutting would root in soil? The lady at the nursery says no it won't. I bought a tree with a Wisteria twined around it and don't know if it should be tossed out or propagated somehow.
by Triss on August 27, 2006 09:38 AM
Rita, What about some hanging planters? You have it up on a trellis, don't you?

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by SpringFever on August 27, 2006 10:40 AM
It will grow from a cutting it is just hard to do and sucess rate is less... I am doing that right now...I was trying to think of some way of doing that Triss... Maybe if I could get a board across... the thing about the trellis is it is leaning like// <---- this!! The vine is getting way to heavy...
I am trying this and other than that the vine is almost to the ground so I can easily put pots around and layer it that way!!

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by Triss on August 27, 2006 10:50 AM
quote:
the trellis is it is leaning like// <---- this!!
Well now THAT is not good. More weight is proabably not a good thing then!

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by SpringFever on August 27, 2006 12:40 PM
This // is my biggest problem! [Big Grin] [Big Grin] I am going to have to cut it out of the trellis probably by next year for sure..then find a much better support for it!

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by Triss on August 27, 2006 01:35 PM
4x4's!

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by SpringFever on August 27, 2006 02:30 PM
well the rebar is not holding it down... Have to find something that looks nice too though... Something permanent.. steel concreted down.. [Roll Eyes]

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by Triss on August 27, 2006 02:41 PM
Well I hope you fin something. There was a link somewhere that showed a HUGE wisteria and it was supported by a very cool trellis. Lemme see if I can find it.

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by Triss on August 27, 2006 02:47 PM
This is not the one I was looking for but it is supposed to be the largest wisteria in the world.

wisteria

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by SpringFever on August 27, 2006 03:25 PM
I have seen that one... I am hoping to grow it into tree form.. the support will have to be strong though.. and my yard is not that big!! this thing is taking over! [Big Grin] [Big Grin]

* * * *
 -
 -
Tonight I am having friends for dinner... Hanibal Lector My Album
by Triss on August 27, 2006 03:42 PM
I could handle that problem!

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by TulsaRose on August 27, 2006 11:16 PM
Triss, thanks for posting that link...that is stunning, to say the least. [Wink] Maybe mine will look like that in a hundred years. lol! I wish now I had planted it in the middle of the yard instead of near the fence. It's a constant battle keeping it out of the neighbors yard but they love it when it blooms. [Wink]

* * * *
Rosie z7a
 -
 -
by netty on August 28, 2006 04:28 AM
Holy smokes! You really gotta love your Wisteria to let it take over your house!! That is AMAZING!

* * * *
 -
 -
by Triss on August 28, 2006 05:09 AM
It sure is. One of these days I want a wisteria over a gazebo but never over the entire house! A well reinforced gazebo!

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by Deborah L. on August 28, 2006 03:31 PM
Rosie, which one do you have?
I have the Texas purple one, and it grows in a big clay pot.
It bloomed well this year.
I keep it as a giant bonsai.

* * * *
 -
 -
by TulsaRose on August 28, 2006 10:38 PM
Deborah, I don't know...it's just the old fashioned rambling lavender Wisteria. At one point, I was ready to chop it down because it had never bloomed. Found out after twelve years or longer that it was probably my fault for planting it under a giant Sycamore. Plus I pruned it way too often and was probably cutting off the buds for the next years blooms.

I didn't prune it for a year after I lost the Sycamore and VOILA...I had lots of bloom this year! Next year should be even better! [Wink] The size of the plant is deceiving in this picture. It is about 4'ft tall, 8' spread. For comparison, the remainder of that Sycamore you can see to the right...that's 4' across. It looks a little "nekkid" at the time of bloom...foliage starts afterwards. [Wink]
 -

* * * *
Rosie z7a
 -
 -
by sue099 on September 14, 2006 09:51 PM
Wow...now THATS a wisteria! [grin]

I planted mine in the fall of 2004 and it is growing well in its location, which gets morning to mid afternoon sun.
However it has yet to bloom (which I was told was normal for wisteria), except I had one very small cluster of flower buds about 3 weeks ago... Does that make any sense to anyone? I thought it was supposed to flower in Spring.

Also when is the best time to prune it and how much pruning is best to get flowers?

* * * *
Nature is the art of God ~ Thomas Browne,1635
by buzylady on September 14, 2006 11:52 PM
I have an old mesh sattelite upside down ontop of the dog kennel. I stsrted a cutting of wisteria there. It has taken 3 yrs. to start growing, but finally getting there. Maybe I'll have some blooms this yr. Some of the cuttings had hair roots. It was hard to get them out of the ground. My sister-in-law was trimming hers. I'll try to get a pic. Be right back.
Diane

* * * *
buzz buzz buzz  -
 -
http://s86.photobucket.com/albums/k103/Di_06/
by buzylady on September 15, 2006 12:50 AM
 -
OK it's hard to make out right now. The morning glories are crowding it.
Here's a pic of inside the kennel. There's a tarp on top to keep rain out. (Though it leaks now) The satelite gives lots of shade.
 -
I tried to resize it. But it went really small. Photobucket is being weird.

* * * *
buzz buzz buzz  -
 -
http://s86.photobucket.com/albums/k103/Di_06/
by angelfishsj on November 21, 2006 01:00 PM
I know this is far behind the last post, but I live in the south and me and hubby find cutting back the Wisteria each year is very helpful, I wish my camera was not broken, we make a bush out of the old Wisteria in our yard. Between cutting it back and training the runners back into the plant it makes a wonderful bush for us.Hopefully before it blooms again I will have a new camera.

* * * *
Susan B.
by maja24 on November 27, 2006 05:14 AM
Hi there,

Can you grow a Wisteria from seed? And if so, when and how do you do this?

Paulien [wavey] [flower]

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on November 27, 2006 07:31 AM
Susan, I've never heard of anyone making a Wisteria into a bush, but what a neat idea! I started one from seed last year, but I gave it away because I've seen some massive Wisteria around here & just have no place for anything that gets so big!

Triss, did I give that to you? Maybe I want it back! [grin] [Big Grin] Did the cuttings make it? ...(The ones that you got when we went to see my church lady friend's strawberry tower?)

Paulien, Mine wasn't hard to start at all. I nicked the seed & soaked it (actually for a couple weeks, but I don't think it needs to be soaked for that long), then I put it in soil & kept it damp. It was doing fine & got lots bigger than I thought it would, but I left it in a 6" pot, cuz I knew it'd be a slow grower. The last time I saw it, it looked pretty happy!

Who DID I give that thing to? [dunno]

* * * *
 -
 -
by angelfishsj on November 28, 2006 11:25 AM
Patty,

I wish my camera worked, but my hubby used it to take pics on a job of his and dropped it from 20ft building, now my batteries will not stay in or I would post a pic. When we moved in on our property over 10yrs ago I had one that was already here and now have about 3. Every year my hubby trains it back into place and have a nice size bush from the results. Although at the time we did not know anything about it, but I had seen the pretty purple blooms already so I would not let him destroy it. Now he fusses about mowing around it when the runners go crazy, because they tend to hit him in him face. But I just remind him it is time to send the runners back to the base of the plant.

* * * *
Susan B.
by Patty S on November 28, 2006 02:31 PM
Susan, we just can't trust those big boys with our toys!  -
(They don't seem to realize that we NEED our cameras for taking pics of flowers!)
I found a long strap & hooked it onto the short wrist strap on my cam, & the rule is: "It goes around your neck!" [critic]

I've been thinking about your Wisteria bush, & have decided that I'd just love to have a while hedge of those! I have a friend whose entire patio is actually 3 Wisterias, & she keeps them trimmed so they'll stay where she wants them. I'm going to ask her if she harvested any seeds this year, or maybe I can get some starts from her. (I have to remember to get pics of her patio next spring!)

Maybe I shouldn't say this, but anybody who drops a camera 20 feet DESERVES to get smacked by Wisteria runners! [Big Grin]

* * * *
 -
 -
by maja24 on December 03, 2006 05:07 PM
Thank you so much Patty, for your info. Another question; when did you sow it? And did you put the pot outside or inside?
Hope you can help me with this questions too!

Paulien [wavey]

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on December 04, 2006 01:23 AM
Paulien, I started the "slow germinating" seeds in January ...with an electric blanket under them, as I'm too "frugal" to buy heat mats! [lala] Once it sprouted it went under full spectrum fluorescent grow lights.

This is what the setup looked like in my garage. I put water in coffee cans, to keep the humidity level up, & set lamps (with regular light bulbs) on the shelves close to the cans to provide heat, as fluorescent lights don't throw much heat. The shelves stayed covered with plastic sheeting to hold in the heat & humidity. (The plastic sheet was rolled up here, so I could snap the pic.)
 -

The only log I kept of my growing progress this year was with pics, but I remember that I was surprised when the Wisteria seed didn't take "forever" to germinate, as I was told they would. (As I mentioned earlier though, I did nick & soak the Wisteria seed.)

This pic was taken in early March... the plants on the top shelf were the slower germinating ones that I'd started early, while the annuals that had sprouted the week before are on the lower shelf.

When the Wisteria was big enough for a pot, I hardened it off before leaving it outside all the time.

* * * *
 -
 -
by maja24 on December 04, 2006 03:31 AM
Wow Patty, that looks great!!!!
Thank you so much for all your information! I would really love to make something like that myself but don't like to keep lights/ electrical things on when i'm not at home.
But i will look into it.

Paulien [flower]

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on December 04, 2006 05:04 AM
I forgot to say that I also keep a little fan going inside my "greenhouse" shelves. (The box on the far right in the bottom shelf is a little Norelco "Clean Air Machine", which seems to be perfect for the amount of space my seedlings are in.)

** Maintaining good air circulation is important in an enclosed plant area, to supply needed carbon dioxide to the foliage & to prevent condensation which leads to the culture of disease organisms in stagnant air space.

I understand & appreciate your caution about leaving lights on when you're not at home, Paulien. (Especially lights that produce heat.)
I'm not as concerned about that as I am about the extension cord that I end up using for the fluorescent lights, incandescent lamps & the fan!  - Many electrical things have a built-in safety feature, designed to shut down in case of over heating or curcuit overload, but I know I'm pressing my luck, having all those things plugged in without a surge protector! (Underwriter's Laboratories would freak out if they knew, because my practice negates their efforts of approving appliance safety!)

If you can set up such a thing for your seedlings, I wouldn't think that it would hurt them if you only turn the lights & the fan on when you're at home, as long as it's indoors where the temperature doesn't drop below 55* ...although high spectrum lighting (or natural sunlight) is important, to keep the plants from getting leggy.

* * * *
 -
 -
by maja24 on December 04, 2006 06:56 AM
Maybe i could make a little fan by using a sunlight collector? You do have a point there, I have a little plastic greenhouse outside (pic in photobucket below) and when i zip it, it becomes very moist.

But i couldn't get a high spectrum lighting work on solar energy unfortunately! [Frown]

And it wouldn't work when it's dark.....

I just use my spare bedroom with aluminium foil against the walls, it's unheated but light and i can start seeds a bit earlier as if outside.

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on December 04, 2006 03:55 PM
Does your spare room get direct sunlight for most of the day? If so, place your seed trays (& seedlings) where the sun will shine right on them. (DO NOT set your seedlings right next to the window where they'll get too hot when the heat is magnified by the glass. I learned that one the hard way!) I'm not sure about reflected sunlight (foil on the walls), as it might not be adequate for required photosynthesis.... but it's worth a try.

Healthy plants need 3 essential things during all stages... energy (from sunlight), carbon dioxide (from moving air) & water (from the soil). Without adequate amounts of each, a plant won't be able to reach its full potential. (Foliage, blossoms, fruit, seeds.)

Heat is also important in germinating many seeds. (But not ALL seeds. Off the top of my head, I can think of a few that prefer cooler conditions, such as lettuce, carrots, peas & Broccoli - Cauliflower family.) While some seeds don't seem to be fussy about temperature, there are those that insist on very warm soil before they'll sprout. (Basil & Pansies come to mind).

You can try starting seeds in your spare bedroom, but once they sprout they will HAVE TO have adequate light, or they'll get spindly & just wither away.

From your picture, your mini greenhouse looks like mine. Last winter I used mine to start the slower germinating seeds (indoors), but when it was time to start the faster sprouting seeds, I ran out of space & everything ended up on my garage shelves.
 -

Using hooks that I made from a clothes hanger, I hung 24" full spectrum fluorescent lights above the shelves. With the plastic cover zipped up, it held the moisture in quite well & maintained a steady temperature, but there was no air movement... so I put my little fan inside. Since the shelves are open "racks", the air was able to move around nicely. (Remember that too much condensation inside that space is not a good thing, because the moisture creates a perfect environment for bacteria to breed, that will infect the plants.)

You sound like you have some pretty good ideas, so dig in & give them a try! Be sure to keep a journal, so you can remember which ones are the most successful. I hope you'll share what worked (& what didn't work) for you... & keep taking pictures!  -

* * * *
 -
 -
by maja24 on December 05, 2006 03:36 AM
Patty, you're so inventive! It's great reading all this and getting ideas this way!

Yes i do have to make a journal, i always think i will remember it but after a year..... [Frown] [Roll Eyes] [Big Grin]

But Patty, been thinking about it all day.... Do you have a smoke-alarm in your garage? You really need one with all that electrical equipment!

All the best,
Paulien [wavey]

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on December 05, 2006 05:32 AM
quote:
Do you have a smoke-alarm in your garage?
Yup... & I even put the batteries back in it.
(Needed to borrow them for the flashlight!) [lala]

* * * *
 -
 -
by maja24 on December 05, 2006 06:39 AM
quote:
Yup... & I even put the batteries back in it.
WHERE THEY BELONG, AND NEVER SHOULD HAVE BEEN TAKEN OUT IN THE FIRST PLACE!!!!!

* * * *
http://home.hetnet.nl/~pvandeburgt/
http://photobucket.com/albums/e344/maja8/?
by Patty S on December 05, 2006 04:46 PM
HEY!
Watch the yelling around here  - ...a lot of people are napping!  -

(Just fooling with you about the batteries, to see if you were paying attention!)  -

See you later, Paulien.  -
Good luck with your Wisteria.

* * * *
 -
 -

Active Garden Forum

Other articles you might like: