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So, if you had to choose one tomato for slicing...

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
Pages: 1 2
by roflol on November 11, 2006 03:19 AM
... which would you grow?

We have a teensy spot for produce gardening, and 3 tomato plants was too many this year (one cherry and two non-cherry [the plants got large but the tomatoes didn't get very large]).

My 5-year-old had a ball growing the tomatoes but he doesn't eat them.... however, *I* do, and the grandparents are very happy to share the bounty and he's proud to take his harvest to them of course.

I think we'll skip the cherry tomatoes and concentrate on the slicers. I'm originally from New Jersey so am wondering how the Rutger's (aka Jersey) measures up to the newer varieties. Naturallement I would prefer heirloom so we could start a tradition and keep it going.

Thanks in advance for any advice and all your opinions.

[flower]
by tkhooper on November 11, 2006 05:38 AM
I'd probably chuck the heirloom idea and go with a compact variety that has been hybridized to produce well in a pot. Then you would be pretty assured of a good harvest.

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by johnCT on November 11, 2006 08:01 AM
Chuck the heirloom in favor of hybrids?!?! Blastphemy!! I guess you could do that if you don't grow tomatoes for taste. [shocked] [nutz]

Are you looking for something that produces or for something that tastes good? Are you looking for a more compact plant? Are you looking for something that you could save your own seed from?

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John - Zone 6
by roflol on November 11, 2006 12:11 PM
No, yes, no, yes. ;-) Did I win?

^
|

Okay, I'll edit; that looked dopey by itself... Three plants was too much, we'll just go for 1 or maybe 2 next year, same variety since I want to save the seed. I definitely want taste since I'm eating them, but I'm not terribly finicky so as long as they're better than grocery bought (and just about anything grown is, right?) it should be fine. I like traditional flavor, and I like to add salt to mine.

Production is not a big issue, everybody around here grows tomatoes so sharing with the grandparents is more of a trophy issue than a sustenance thing... in other words, the grandparents are not going to go without tomatoes if we don't provide them.

I understand your point of view, too, Tammy. Your circumstances are special, being in a very very confined space. I should have been more specific with my question. I have room for 2 full size plants (3 was too many) and I don't need a huge crop.

I'm looking specifically at what the taste preferences are, and specifically what the general consensus is on Rutgers (Jersey) tomato since, as I mentioned, I'm a Joisey transplant myself. Did anybody grow this variety, and did you like it?

Thanks again for all opinions.

[flower]
by MrClint on November 12, 2006 01:41 AM
I say go for it. Don't let anybody talk you out of it either. I've never grown Rutgers, but just about any homegrown tomato is going to be much better than store bought. New Jersey is good tomato growing country as well, so you'll be just fine.

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by weezie13 on November 12, 2006 02:38 AM
quote:
Originally posted by tkhooper:
I'd probably chuck the heirloom idea
Heyyyyyy Tam, I was going to say you'd better
"duck" with those words if Julianna or John see them.. [Wink] [Wink]
They are definately heirloom diehards.... [grin] [grin]
but I see John already beat me here... [Wink]

I have to say, I grew the Rutgers', they were a good plant, produced, nice, and basically why I grow them, I find them cheap and early locally *the seeds* so, I grab 'em cause I"m a sucker for "homegrown" tomatoes like MrClint said, any "Homegrown" one is wayyyyyy better than any store bought one, any day..
(I'm duckin' too, when I say that... [Wink] [Big Grin] )

Compact sizes though, I'd go with any John suggest...<~~~~

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by weezie13 on November 12, 2006 02:48 AM
quote:
Originally posted by roflol:
My 5-year-old had a ball growing the tomatoes but he doesn't eat them.... however, *I* do.

I think we'll skip the cherry tomatoesThanks in advance for any advice and all your opinions.

Opinion on that one...

Never skip the cherries in my eyes, especially if you're tryin' to get them to eat from the garden...

Never skip something cause they don't eat it..
*at least for 5 or 6 years.. and even then always give them some to at least try...
Tastes' change*

*and this is a proven theory, that if you continue to give a child something on their plate, even if they don't eat it... eventually it'll be there so many times, that if you put that on their plate when you introduce a new food, they will at least try the old food, cause they've seen it so many times, they are more familiar with that food than the new one you put on the plate...~~~>does that many any sense?<~~~
And IMHO if your little one sees you eating them, then your chances are reasonably good he may too..
*I snack on them all the time while doing gardening chores and my kids don't exactly like tomatoes, but are willing to keep tryin' them, because they see how fanatical their mother is about them...*

And last but not least in the opinion department..
if you have a small growing area...
don't forget about growing tomatoes in 5 gallon food grade buckets...
Works really good... [thumb]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Deborah L. on November 12, 2006 08:48 AM
My one and only positive experience buying a store tomato was when all the posts about Cherokee purples got to me and I bought one.
That thing was so good that it's made me plan to grow them this spring.

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by reba on November 13, 2006 12:51 AM
Celebrity is a nice slicing tomato,looks almost like sirloin inside (solid meat,little juice) and a nice taste.I favor pink brandywine for taste,they are ugly but great tasting.Sun Gold for the best cherry tomato.
by obywan59 on November 13, 2006 02:41 PM
Deborah, I grew Cherokee Purple this year for the first time, and it was awesome!!! I rank it right up there with Brandywine for flavor. Some people might be a bit put off by the color though.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by obywan59 on November 13, 2006 02:45 PM
Roflol, do you stake your tomatoes? If you stake them and train them to only 2 main stems or so, you can space them 2 feet apart. How much space do you have?

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Terry

May the force be with you
by tkhooper on November 13, 2006 07:54 PM
Sorry if I offended. I didn't mean to.

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by weezie13 on November 13, 2006 09:02 PM
quote:
Originally posted by tkhooper:
Sorry if I offended. I didn't mean to.
Ohhhhhh no Tammy.. D
You didn't offend anyone....
Not at all...
We just love Tomatoes so much..

But I know how staunch some gardener's can be with certain types, brands, varieties of 'maters..

And I know they both like to joke about their tomatoes being the best..
*which they are veryyyyyyy good...
i just never get around to growing them*

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by johnCT on November 14, 2006 12:45 AM
quote:
Originally posted by tkhooper:
Sorry if I offended. I didn't mean to.
Oh please! No need to apologize. We'll convert you to a devoted REAL tomato grower yet. If the whole thing about poor production is the only thing stopping you, you really need to check into them more. There are many, many heirlooms that will out-produce even the most prolific hybrids. This is a common misconception. Sure, there are varieties like some brandywines that do not produce all that great, but even the few you get will make your eyes roll back in your head compared to, say, an early girl.

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John - Zone 6
by Sorellina on November 14, 2006 09:46 AM
Ciao roflol,

My favourite tomato, bar none is Brandywine Sudduth. It doesn't produce a ton, but what it does will make your eyes roll back in your head. It's a gorgeous, slightly flattened pink tomato that will fill a piece of bread nicely and makes an absolutely heavenly BLT.

Another one I adore for slicing is German Red Strawberry, a heart-shaped variety, which is actually pink, not red. The only difference between a pink and red tomato is the skin colour..pink tomatoes have a clear skin, red tomatoes have a yellow skin. I'm quite partial to pink and purple tomatoes.

My third choice would be Black From Tula, a dark purple slicer, which for me has a very rich, almost smoky flavour I really like. This plant is what I'd call a compact indeterminate. It won't get huge, but in my garden, it gets quite bushy and will absolutely need staking. This year it got to about 5' tall.

My favourite green when ripe tomato is Aunt Ruby's German Green with it's almost spicy flavour. This one's a monster and can grow over 8' tall in the right conditions so consider that before you plant. It's a great producer, too.

Orange Strawberry was a huge hit this year as well. Gorgeous colour, very dense, meaty tomato, really great as a sandwich tomato.

I'd say those are the standouts. If you like a really huge tomato, grow Marianna's Peace. It's another pink and the tomatoes I got from it in 2005 were averaging 2 lbs each.

Cheers,
Julianna

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by MrClint on November 15, 2006 12:46 PM
There are many factors that determine tomato taste, and each region or climate tends to have it's favorites. That Early Girl that you just snubbed is a huge favorite here in the west. I picked the first one in March and sliced one just yesterday (and there has been a bunch in between). They are very good.

I took a plate of EG to Tomatomania here a few years back, and sat them right next to the brandywine this-eth, and the cherokee that-eth and marveled at the comments. One lady proclaimed, "Now that's how a tomato should taste!"

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by roflol on November 15, 2006 01:24 PM
Terry, your comment explains a lot. We only had a 3x2 raised bed to work with (size was determined by how many cinder blocks we scrounged) and we didn't prune a single branch back (unless obviously dead... I just couldn't make myself do it) so it's no wonder the tomatoes didn't overwhelm us, lol - they didn't have enough room (to make matters worse, they shared that bed with the doomed pumpkin vines). But we did stake (with anything that would hold them up) when they started to fall all over each other.

Funny how it looked like there was all the room in the world for the 3 of them when we planted them, though!

Welllll, y'all are not making the choice easy of which variety or two for me to grow, are you? *Everything* sounds so good!

Do all the varieties you've been discussing come true from seed that you've saved, or do you buy new seed year to year? (I am still learning about this bit).

Thanks again for all the information, everybody.

[flower]
by johnCT on November 15, 2006 09:26 PM
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:

I took a plate of EG to Tomatomania here a few years back, and sat them right next to the brandywine this-eth, and the cherokee that-eth and marveled at the comments. One lady proclaimed, "Now that's how a tomato should taste!"

Anyone used to eating hybrids or supermarket tomatoes is going to say that.

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John - Zone 6
by johnCT on November 15, 2006 09:31 PM
quote:
Originally posted by roflol:
Do all the varieties you've been discussing come true from seed that you've saved, or do you buy new seed year to year?
Without mechanical pollinator barriers or adequate geographical isolation there is always a chance of tomatoes cross-pollinating, but with the natural structure of the tomato flower the percentages are only in the 5-10% range.

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John - Zone 6
by roflol on November 15, 2006 11:50 PM
Thanks, John.

I think what I will do is this: The small bed will be home to two Rutgers if I can get seed for that; we'll see how they do and continue that if we like them. If not, we'll try something else in 2008.

I am still interested in other varieties mentioned here, including cherry tomatoes (you're right weezie - heck, the little guy *loves* pizza, there's no reason he can't learn to love tomatoes by themselves eventually) so will start collecting some big buckets and have a few more plants in other places in the front and back yard, far enough away from each other and with enough plants between them that I would hope cross pollination won't be an issue at all.

Thanks again to each of you!
by MrClint on November 16, 2006 12:49 AM
quote:
Originally posted by johnCT:
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:

I took a plate of EG to Tomatomania here a few years back, and sat them right next to the brandywine this-eth, and the cherokee that-eth and marveled at the comments. One lady proclaimed, "Now that's how a tomato should taste!"

Anyone used to eating hybrids or supermarket tomatoes is going to say that.

Taste is completely subjective. In reality, most folks grow both hybrids and heirlooms. There are productive and tasty tomatoes of both kinds.

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by johnCT on November 16, 2006 09:23 PM
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:
In reality, most folks grow both hybrids and heirlooms. There are productive and tasty tomatoes of both kinds.
That is quite an over-generalization. In reality, people who grow hybrids do so because they don't know better. They're the ones who buy their transplants at HD or walmart and are willing to settle for their taste not knowing there are far better tasting varieties available. [Roll Eyes]

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John - Zone 6
by weezie13 on November 16, 2006 10:27 PM
I have to butt in here for a bit..
Sometimes when first time gardeners get
even interested in gardening at first..
I am grateful that they are willing to take the
time to grow a tomato, no matter what brand..
And when a person starts to garden, how do they know what is or is not available to grow, especially they start with growing what's available..
And if the hybrids' are what's available..
How would that gardener know? [dunno]

Some don't have the internet connections,
or even maybe savy *of knowing how to surf and get/find info* so, they again are limited to what they are given or what's available to them..

I still stick by my HO [Embarrassed] [Smile] that ANY tomato HOMEGROWN is waaaaaayyyyyy better than any store bought..

But I truly understand the need for heirloom seeds to be kept and continued...
And for those who are so deeply involved in them to help educate and spread good will with those
"heirloom varieties* that are falling behind the way side to those "pretty" new hybrids...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by weezie13 on November 16, 2006 10:31 PM
Also, I will stand by the process of talking, because one gardener loves one variety, and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy, [gabby] and tells the next guy [gabby]

And that's how we spread the word of those heirloom tomatoes that have gotten left behind or forgotten...
because they don't look "pretty"....

So, if we keep talking positive of heirloom varieties... I believe that eventually there will be an even scale for both sides...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Deborah L. on November 17, 2006 09:18 AM
Oby, yes, the Cherokee wouldn't win any beauty contests, but it was so good it really surprised me.
I also really like the yellow pear, and want to grow the red pear too.
And the little Reisentraube and for fun, the teeny Micro-Tom.
Oops, I just remembered that this thread is about slicers. [Embarrassed]

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by roflol on November 17, 2006 11:11 AM
It originally was, Deborah L., but we can go into cherries cause I'm going there after all... I'm curious about the Tumbling Tom as there is plenty of room to hang baskets of this under the eaves of the deck (west side of house, tons of sun, and they would not take up any space on the ground). Any experience with this variety?

And since there's activity on this thread, I'm begging - if you haven't already, please read this thread re the struggling corkscrew vine rooted cuttings and share your ideas on what could possibly be going on with these things. I'm at a loss.

Thanks in advance as always.

[Love]
by comfrey on November 17, 2006 11:56 AM
Well for slicing I have been growing Brandywine for many years, they are large, not always pretty to look at, but that doesn't change the taste at all, and a very good slicer. And as stated heirlooms are not always the prettiest as far as looks, but some of them are very tasty, So you should try heirloom tomatoes and other heirloom veggies....Our ancestors grew them and were satisfied.

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by MrClint on November 17, 2006 01:40 PM
I would urge anyone that hasn't already made up their mind about hybrids and heirlooms -- to continue keeping an open mind. Otherwise, you might miss out on some truly great tomatoes of either type. The Internet is a great resource, but so are your neighbors, state and/or county extension, and local nursery person. I hope that sounds more reasonable than, "if you disagree with me it means you don't know any better."

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by markr on November 17, 2006 06:17 PM
I agree with MrClint!
This year i grew a F1 hybrid called FERLINE, and it was the best tom ive grown.
every year i grow at least 1 new variety, FERLINE will be my first choice again next year, because its the only one ive grown that has'nt had any problems.
The reason i grew it, was because it was said to be blight resistant!
and yes it was [thumb]
my dad grew his old favourite MONEYMAKER (op)beside mine and they got blight.
Taste was great'and a bonus was nice thin skins

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Mark
by Deborah L. on November 18, 2006 12:57 AM
Roflol, no, I've never grown Tumbling Tom.
I don't know anything about the corkscrew, sorry.

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by comfrey on November 18, 2006 05:07 AM
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:
I would urge anyone that hasn't already made up their mind about hybrids and heirlooms -- to continue keeping an open mind. Otherwise, you might miss out on some truly great tomatoes of either type. The Internet is a great resource, but so are your neighbors, state and/or county extension, and local nursery person. I hope that sounds more reasonable than, "if you disagree with me it means you don't know any better."
[Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] I do not disagree (but I probable don't know any better either [Wink] ) , and being open minded is a very good way to be. When I first moved to Arkansas...I ask the locals what kind of tomato they grew...Arkansas Traveler is what everyone around here swears by, Ok..so I tried them the first year...I hated the taste the skins were tough, it was horrid to me...But to them they love them....So yes a person needs to try different things and find the perfect one for themselves, whether it is heirloom or hybrid.

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by MrClint on November 18, 2006 09:09 AM
There you go, taste is subjective. As for perfection, I gave up searching for that phantom years ago. [Smile]

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by Sorellina on November 19, 2006 04:36 AM
Ciao all,

I think John was misunderstood. I think what he was trying to convey is that for most people, they will buy what's easily available and if the nursery has it, whether it's heirloom or hybrid, that's what they'll go for. He and I both discovered heirlooms and after really amazing success, decided to go totally nuts and grow as many as we could shoe-horn into our yards. And now we're totally hooked. BUT..I actually got seeds from an absolutely outstanding hybrid from this same guy..Sungold F1, an orange cherry which is arguably the sweetest tomato on the planet. So it was the only hybrid in our yard, but still, we're not totally anti-hybrid for the sake of it. Show me a hybrid that tastes as good or better than an heirloom and I'll give it a shot. The downside is we can't save seeds from these things, but at $4 a pop for Sungold F1 seeds every single year if that's the only tomato I have to actually fork out money for, I'm ok with that. I'm also totally ok with trading with people because like John said, cross-pollination is still a very low probability even without bothering to bag blossoms and I got some very interesting tomatoes this year from another tomato-growing addict which were accidental crosses.

Cheers,
Julianna

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by ChristinaC on November 19, 2006 04:52 AM
quote:
So, if you had to choose one tomato for slicing...
Everyone has a right to choose what they want...no one's opinion is wrong or right...it's just what they prefer. I prefer a sour tasting tomato over a sweet...I've found MANY hybrids that quench that craving for me!
You just have try out a few varities whether they be hybrid or heirloom and see what your preference is.
Also, a tomato plant grown in my soil may taste completely different than the exact variety in the neighbour's garden due to soil conditions.
Of all varieties I've grown (and there's many), I still prefer my Better Boys! My mouth waters when I slice it..this coming from a girl who can live of tomatoes (and basically does!).

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by MrClint on November 19, 2006 06:39 AM
I've been in these hybrid versus heirloom discussions elsewhere. Nobody ever wins these things. Posts usually end up getting pulled or users banned. Heirloom fans are very passionate, almost driven! I like both types of tomatoes and choose to judge the plants on their own merits. Most folks are basically pragmatic versus being simply uninformed.

As for sungolds, they are simply awesome tomatoes. I am "ordered" to always grow them. Other great tasting hybrids that I am ordered to grow are momotaro, and juliet. This further proves the rule that taste is subjective, as each of these is the favorite of at least one family member. The juliet fan in the family does not care for sungold at all... So on and so forth.

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by weezie13 on November 19, 2006 06:57 AM
We love tomato talk here MrClint..
And we'd never ban anyone for talkin' tomato.....

In my book anyone who takes the time to grow
tomatoes and talk tomatoes and to help those new
gardners learn how to grow "any" tomatoes is A~ok in my book... [grin]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by ChristinaC on November 19, 2006 07:09 AM
I admire your passion MrClint! [thumb]

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by Deborah L. on November 20, 2006 03:09 AM
Welp, I'll bet I'm banned.... [scaredy] [tears]
Because to me the Sungold cherry was so bad I spit it out.
AND, I really like only tangy tomatoes, like Christina does.
I don't even like the super sweet corns-OK, now I KNOW I'm banned....
No !! I wanna stay ! [kissies] [Wink]

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by comfrey on November 20, 2006 12:52 PM
Deborah...You are so funny, no one is going to ban you because you say you didn't like the taste of a certain kind of tomato. Everyone is different, as are their tastes. Also as was pointed out...alot of other factors can change the taste from garden to garden of the same kind of tomato. I'll be trying a few new varieties this next growing season and I hope to find a few I really like the taste of, I'll be growing only heirloom varieties, as I like to be able to save seed, esp if it something I really like the taste of.

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by weezie13 on November 20, 2006 01:00 PM
Nope, not banning you Deb..... [kissies]

You qualify to stay... [thumb] [kissies]
You're [gabby] talkin' [gabby] TOMATO [gabby] !!!

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Deborah L. on November 20, 2006 02:18 PM
I get to stay !!! [clappy] [kissies]

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by johnCT on November 20, 2006 09:52 PM
quote:
Originally posted by ChristinaC:
[QUOTE]
Of all varieties I've grown (and there's many), I still prefer my Better Boys! My mouth waters when I slice it..this coming from a girl who can live of tomatoes (and basically does!).

...and how many "heirlooms" have you grown Christina?

This is my point, most people have not experienced a really good tomato, so in their minds they can't realistically compare them. I would be willing to be a week's pay that if you put 100 blindfolded tomato lovers in front of a sliced better boy/early girl, etc., and a sliced brandywine, 95 of the 100 would prefer the brandywine and the other five probably had serious head colds or something clouding their judgement. [Roll Eyes]

Christina and Deb, if you like a "tangy" rather than "sweet" fruit, try some of the green-when-ripes. And Deb, don't judge Sungold on one year's growing. Try it again.

There are few hybrids that can be compared to most "heirlooms" IN GENERAL. Sungold, Brandy Boy, Big Beef to name a few, would be worthy in any devoted OP grower's garden in regards to taste.

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John - Zone 6
by MrClint on November 21, 2006 12:23 AM
At the end of the day most folks want it all. Since growing space is limited, we need taste, production and high quality fruit. It does us little good to focus on only one of those elements and forsake the others. I mention fruit quality because it can be a huge waste to carve out all the cracks, splits, scald and other bad spots from a completely mis-shapen tomato.

I've tasted a large number of tomatoes both heirloom and hybrid and have favorites of both kinds. The tables can be turned and one can ask an heirloom fan how many hybrids they've grown/tasted. You can't judge all hybrids on the boys, bigs or girls.

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.
by ChristinaC on November 21, 2006 01:17 AM
quote:
Big Beef
Here's Jamie's Big Beef:

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Far too sweet for me.

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by johnCT on November 21, 2006 03:14 AM
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:
You can't judge all hybrids on the boys, bigs or girls.
Then what are you going to judge them against? Surely not on the ones sold in grocery stores. [Roll Eyes]

You know exactly the point I'm making. You have quite an eloquent way of being argumentative. I've seen it on other forums as well. Fools some I guess.

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John - Zone 6
by Deborah L. on November 21, 2006 06:38 AM
Way to go, Jamie ! Those are beautiful tomatoes ! [thumb] [wavey]

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by ChristinaC on November 21, 2006 09:02 AM
Aww..how nice of you Deborah! I have a thread going in "Gardening with Disabilities" about Jamie...though I haven't added to it in quite some time.
They are beautiful looking tomatoes aren't they? [Smile]
Thanks again,
Christina

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by comfrey on November 21, 2006 09:23 AM
quote:
Originally posted by johnCT:
quote:
Originally posted by MrClint:
You can't judge all hybrids on the boys, bigs or girls.
Then what are you going to judge them against? Surely not on the ones sold in grocery stores. [Roll Eyes]

Ok...guys [critic] If everyone agreed on everything...then there would be no need for choice.

Surely not on the ones sold in grocery stores? [nutz] [shocked] [shocked] See now that is the problem...people have become to dependent on the grocery stores for all of their food needs, instead of having a small veggie garden to provide fresh food for their family at least in season, they have no idea of what "REAL" Food really tastes like, so how can one judge unless they have experienced it before. [teacher] Experience is the best teacher!...Sorry that was a long sentence..I'm taking a breath now [Razz] You get the idea right??? Its a Win, Win for everyone who grows their own no matter which kind "they chose" to grow! [kissies]

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by roflol on November 21, 2006 11:47 AM
I'm sorry if the discussion has gotten anybody testy, I certainly didn't mean for it to.

I'd like to clarify something in my very first post that I think had I been more specific and less poetic in describing *may* have avoided all this:
quote:
I said:
Naturallement I would prefer heirloom so we could start a tradition and keep it going.
By this, I meant I wanted to save the seeds of whatever variety we chose and keep growing it year after year (if we liked it). I'm still learning the nuances of hybridization, but is it correct that it's heirloom I would be wanting for this purpose, as hybrid may or may not grow true from seed? Please correct me if I am wrong there.

I was silly thinking there was one tomato that would be a hands-down favorite to grow and eat. [Confused] Heck, I had no idea there were so many different tomatoes to begin with!

I am in the process of obtaining a few different varieties (Rutgers original for the bed, and Brandywine {pink and red} and Purple Cherokee for buckets, and still hunting for Tumbling Tom for baskets) and hopefully someday when somebody even newer than I comes on the board and asks this question I can tell them my experience with those tomatoes.

I can tell you (because I just dug the tags out of my seed box) that the tomatoes we grew from plants bought at Wal-Mart were Bonnie brand Heartland and Husky Cherry Red. Both were better than store-bought; that's about all I have to compare them to at this point. Maybe next year I can specify better compared to what I grow from seed.

Obviously everybody has different tastes. I appreciate everybody sharing their opinions and telling their favorites.

[thumb]
by MrClint on November 21, 2006 12:59 PM
Those are some good looking tomatoes. Thanks for sharing! [Smile]

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According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.

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