Hummingbird House The Garden Helper
No-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web since 1997
vine bar
Wild Willy
 

Overwintering Jalapenos

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
« Prev thread: Overwintering in containers| Next thread: Overwintering Mums »
Back to Thread index
by plantgirl on October 16, 2006 11:32 AM
Last year I left my jalapenos outside in the ground to see what would happen. This is possible b/c I live in Inland Southern California and a hard freeze is not very likely.

This summer I had a large jalapeno harvest and the three plants have done well. But now it's fall again and I'm wondering if the plants should be left for another year, if I should trim them back or what is best for the plant?

Any advice is appreciated.

Sincerely,
Plantgirl
by PAR_Gardener on October 21, 2006 12:05 PM
Peppers are actually perennials, so if you don't have a hard freeze you can just let them grow. I kept a pepper plant alive for 3 years. I don't have your nice weather, so I had to bring it in every winter. It never really thrived because it always grew spider mites in the winter. I did get peppers off of it every summer, but they're so easy to start from seed so I let it go this year. It stayed outside instead when the hard freeze hit in early October.

* * * *
Composting is more than good for your garden. It's a way of life.
by garden gourmet on October 26, 2006 07:00 AM
Sounds like another reason to move south when I retire. We love peppers! [Cool]

And plantgirl - I'm jealous! We've had snow already.

Andy - N. Central WV
by Triss on October 26, 2006 07:51 AM
As long as it is healthy, I would let it go as it is. Maybe some pruning of leggy branches. I sure iwsh I could keep my plants going for 3 years! WOW. I am not planning on bringing any of mine in this year but may next year if I have any in planters. Lst year I was able to overwinter several pepper plants indoors and they did so well the 2nd year outside once I moved them back.

* * * *
 -
 -
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by comfrey on October 26, 2006 09:50 AM
quote:
Originally posted by PAR_Gardener:
but they're so easy to start from seed so I let it go this year.
I agree they are easy to start from seed....But if I lived where plantgirl lives....I would keep the pepperplant going as long as possible, I'd do like Triss said prune out some of the branches...I would also prune out the inside stems...to open up the plant to better air circulation (you know shape it like you would a Jade)Leaving all the main sturdy stems and a few branches off of them.

quote:
Originally posted by garden gourmet:
Sounds like another reason to move south when I retire. We love peppers! [Cool]

And plantgirl - I'm jealous! We've had snow already. Andy - N. Central WV

[muggs] I second that on moving to the south!
And I'm also jealous, but those warm weather folks are jealous of us with colder weather, as we can grow things they can't...So its even [thumb]

Oh one more thing plantgirl....Be sure if you here that the weather is going to get too cold for your pepper plant (Oh and you should name it) That you go out and make a tent over your plant...something like a blanket would work good, just don't let what ever you cover it up with touch the plant. And be sure to keep us up to date how your plant is doing, if you give it a name and we would love to see a picture of it.

* * * *
 -
 -
by Deborah L. on October 26, 2006 10:42 AM
Yep, Comfrey, I have never even seen real lilacs or smelled lilacs either.
Or something pretty coming up bravely from under the snow, so many things.
The posts about driveways rolling with walnuts make me drool with envy !

* * * *
 -
 -
by MrClint on October 30, 2006 10:05 AM
Don't forget that pests overwinter too! Hard freeze locations don't have root knot nematodes and other baddies to worry about. It's all good.

I've overwintered peppers and found the first year's harvest to be the best, and the second year to be less than satisfactory. As a result, I yank any plants that perform poorly or that start to fade.

* * * *
According to my calculations, the problem doesn't exist.

Active Garden Forum

« Prev thread: Overwintering in containers| Next thread: Overwintering Mums »
Back to Thread index

Other articles you might like: