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Meyer Lemons

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
by meme1965 on May 26, 2006 01:38 PM
I planted a Meyer Lemon last year full of blooms and got about 10 big beautiful lemons at Christmas.

This year there are no blooms on the tree. I have fed and water well. I only pruned bad dead growth.

What could be the problem?

I live in central Alabama.
by peppereater on May 26, 2006 01:44 PM
It may take a little time for the tree to gather it's strength and prepare to fruit again. There have been some conversations here about Meyer Lemon and other container sized citrus fruit, and I know there are several members, at least, who grow them. Try a forum search on the topic, and stick around, you'll probably get several responses as people find your post.

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by Deborah L. on May 26, 2006 02:06 PM
I'm hoping for a reply from Papito.
My Meyer lemon tree looks bad, very dull and droopy, and yet is covered with more small lemons than I can count.
It's about a year old, and I'm wondering if it's possible for young citrus to get TOO MUCH sun?
I'm using chelated iron and E.B. Stone citrus food.
I have it in strong sun all day long, in a 24 inch pot. Maybe I should roll it to the patio, where it will get good sun but not as harsh?
It's not too dry, and I don't think I'm overwatering.
Sure concerns me.

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by Longy on May 26, 2006 07:51 PM
This year there are no blooms on the tree. I have fed and water well. I only pruned bad dead growth.
+++++++++++++
Did you do any tip pruning? Flowers form on the ends of the branches and tip pruning can remove these. How old is your tree?

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The secret is the soil.
by Longy on May 26, 2006 07:55 PM
My Meyer lemon tree looks bad, very dull and droopy, and yet is covered with more small lemons than I can count.
It's about a year old,
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Lemon trees, as with other citrus, are best allowed to grow without fruiting for the first and preferably the second season. This allows the young root system to develop and results in a stronger tree. It would be best to remove the fruit to allow the tree to put its energy into its root system. It's probably wilting due to the small root system trying to maintain the rest of the tree.

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The secret is the soil.
by Deborah L. on May 27, 2006 08:30 AM
Longy, hey, that makes sense. I hadn't thought of that.
OK, so I think I'll trim off all of the teeny lemons just starting, but can't bring myself to cut off the 5 or 6 golf ball sized ones.
But you should see this-every twig loaded with hundreds of tiny little lemons.
I think you're right and today I'm going to trim off the zillions of tinies.
What do you think of a more gentle sun? It cooks all day long, where it is. Maybe a young tree would do better protected but still getting sun?
I was thinking a sunny corner of my patio, not in the open by the garage where it is now.

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by Longy on May 27, 2006 08:37 AM
What do you think of a more gentle sun? It cooks all day long, where it is.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
if it's in a pot, then it could be that the pot is getting really hot in the sun.Even if you do move it to more gentle sun, try and shade the pot too. Try and get 6-8 hrs of early morning to mid day sun as a minimum and keep the water up to the tree. Give it a feed of some seaweed extract too if you want, to bring back the vigour.
With the pruning of young fruit from young trees, i look at it like they are adolescents. Sure, they can have younguns, but they really aren't prepared for it properly are they!

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The secret is the soil.
by Deborah L. on May 27, 2006 09:44 AM
Longy, you are brilliant ! It's in one of those clay-look pots. A huge 24" one. I bet the plastic is cooking too !
OK ! I'm going to put it where I think it'll be happier, plenty of sun on the patio, but gentler and protected more.
I already went out and cut off every single teeny lemon, as well as all of the marble sized ones.
I even cut off the miniscule brown buds that would become flowers, and all the buds and flowers.
I was careful to cut only the little stem where each was attached, so as not to cut off anything that looked like it might form a branch.
I'll keep an eye out for forming buds, and pinch them before they get started. I won't let the tree flower until she's greener, bigger, fuller and happier.
I also cut off lots of yellow and sad looking leaves.
Thanks a million, Longy ! So glad I asked and you answered ! [clappy] [flower]

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by Longy on May 27, 2006 05:08 PM
Thanks a million
++++++++++++++++
that's OK. Can the million be in cash please?

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The secret is the soil.
by peppereater on May 28, 2006 11:51 AM
Longy, I hope you catch this question, too. I have a calamondin (I wanted a Meyer Lemon, wish i had grabbed one when i had the chance!)
The pot it's in is kind of small, but I seem to recall a thread where someone said they resent repotting. What's your advice?

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by Deborah L. on May 28, 2006 03:44 PM
Longy, if you meant a million pennies, no problem ! [Big Grin]

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by Deborah L. on May 28, 2006 03:48 PM
Oh, I know, Monopoly cash..... since you didn't specify.... [grin]

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by Longy on May 28, 2006 05:11 PM
Hey Deborah, i don't know calamondins, which is to say i've never grown one, but i don't see why they would be different to other citrus.

Transplant when it's not in a growing period, probably before new spring growth or maybe once the fruiting is finished in late autumn/winter. Not sure 'bout that timing though.

As with all transplants, ensure the shock is minimised by having the root ball moist but not wet, a drink with seaweed before and after transplanting and again a week later and trim off any old roots or roots that are growing around the pot. Use clean secateurs for this. Do it on a cool afternoon, in the shade and have a spray bottle of seaweed handy to keep the roots moist. Use a good quality potting mix, preferably the same as the one it's already in.
Oh yeah, try and get a wide pot, rather than a narrow, deep one as citrus roots tend to spread horizontally rather than go down deep.
Don't forget the seaweed:-)
Don't worry about the cash thanks. I'll take a cheque.

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The secret is the soil.

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