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Hollyhocks

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by angelblossom on October 17, 2006 06:35 AM
Last spring I planted holly hocks they have grown nicely and I understood they probably would'nt bloom the first year.

Now,, do I cut back it back and mulch it over untill next spring or let it die on it's own this winter??? It is still very green and is still growing (adding new large leaves by the week).. [dunno]

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by netty on October 17, 2006 06:57 AM
I usually just leave them and cut off any dead foliage in the spring.
You do know that Hollyhocks are biennial? If you want flowers the following year you should plant more seeds now.

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by angelblossom on October 17, 2006 07:36 AM
Okay Now I'm confused Netty. If I don't plant seeds with the ones growing now ;then the ones growing now won't bloom in the spring?? I didn't plant seeds I planted Bulbs Or simulair wellll I can't think of what their called [Embarrassed] [lala] [Big Grin]

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Sorrow looks back, Worry looks around, Faith looks up!  -  -
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by Triss on October 17, 2006 07:45 AM
Diane, With hollyhocks, it is good to plant every year. That way you get blooms each year instead of every other year. The ones you have now will bloom next year. The ones you plant now will bloom the year after and so on.

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by angelblossom on October 17, 2006 07:52 AM
OHHHHHHHHH Okay!!Got cha'! [thumb]

Thanks Netty and Triss! [clappy] [kissies]

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Sorrow looks back, Worry looks around, Faith looks up!  -  -
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by Vera_M on October 21, 2006 01:08 AM
I gotta step in on this one LOL!

Not ALL Hollyhock are biennial...many can and do live as short lived perennials and some DO bloom from seed the first year; "Indian Summer" is one that will. The same goes for certain species of Foxglove. The species I keep have been perennial for me for 5 years. I remove all seed pods long before they have formed mature seed and dispose of them to prevent re-seeding...so yes, I'm speaking from experience here [Big Grin]

They are hardy to zone 3 and do just fine without mulching. In summer I cut back all the flowering stalks down into the foliage for a nice fluch of new leaves and a fall re-bloom.
Also try this trick...I believe you will like it especially in windy areas! To create a HH that is fuller, shorter and more compact with several flowring stems, cut the first flowering stems (before they flower) down into the foliage. They will bloom later and be more attractive [Big Grin]

Vera

Vera
by Deborah L. on October 21, 2006 01:41 AM
Vera, how tall do hollyhocks get? I remember them from childhood and they seemed giant to me.
I haven't seen any since. Might be fun for me to grow some !

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by angelblossom on October 21, 2006 02:57 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Vera_M:
I gotta step in on this one LOL!

Not ALL Hollyhock are biennial...many can and do live as short lived perennials and some DO bloom from seed the first year; "Indian Summer" is one that will. The same goes for certain species of Foxglove. The species I keep have been perennial for me for 5 years. I remove all seed pods long before they have formed mature seed and dispose of them to prevent re-seeding...so yes, I'm speaking from experience here [Big Grin]

They are hardy to zone 3 and do just fine without mulching. In summer I cut back all the flowering stalks down into the foliage for a nice fluch of new leaves and a fall re-bloom.
Also try this trick...I believe you will like it especially in windy areas! To create a HH that is fuller, shorter and more compact with several flowring stems, cut the first flowering stems (before they flower) down into the foliage. They will bloom later and be more attractive [Big Grin]

Vera

Vera

Hi Vera [wavey] I don't know which kind I have [lala] and I doubt I can even find the pckg it came in now, but the leaves are Big and green . I did go ahead and put more seed in anyway because they are in an area that has lots of space for more ... Thanks for your special tips andinput I appreciate it! [grin]

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Sorrow looks back, Worry looks around, Faith looks up!  -  -
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by kennyso on October 21, 2006 04:31 AM
Just a word of caution, be very careful if you want to store seeds cuz 99.99999% of the time (from my exprience) there are weevils inside and if you keep them in a plastic bag, you will see them appear in a few days, YUCK!

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by angelblossom on October 21, 2006 06:15 AM
eeeuuuuwwwww thanks Kenny for the 411 on that!! [Eek!]

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Sorrow looks back, Worry looks around, Faith looks up!  -  -
http://photobucket.com/albums/e374/2thtek/  -  -
by tkhooper on October 21, 2006 06:16 AM
I guess the wevils haven't found me yet. My hollyhocks last year and this year were pretty bug free. But that may just have been because the bees loved the hollyhocks and the japanese beattles loved the cleome. And the spider mites loved the marigolds. Funny how that worked isn't it.

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by tkhooper on October 21, 2006 06:17 AM
I guess the wevils haven't found me yet. My hollyhocks last year and this year were pretty bug free. But that may just have been because the bees loved the hollyhocks and the japanese beattles loved the cleome. And the spider mites loved the marigolds. Funny how that worked isn't it.

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