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Miniture Roses... help!?

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by FlowerNewbie on February 08, 2006 05:52 AM
Hi again,

I have this yellow miniture rose plant in a container that I bought from a local grocery store. I've had it for about two weeks. Initially, it was doing great I've gotton several new blooms. But the last few days it has done a turn for the worse. The flowers are looking a little wilted and some of the leaves are now a lighter green (is that bad). Not sure if and when I am sopposed to remove any of the leaves or flowers. So I guess I'll tell you what I am doing so you guys can know where I'm going wrong.

Watering - I water it once a day about 8 ouces and just dump out the water if any that runs through the bottom.

Light - This plant is so beautiful the I have it in the middle of my dining table which has 2 east facing windows next to it. In the morning after watering I take onto my balcony for some extra sun and bring it in by dark. I'm in zone 6 so it's still a bit cold but pretty sunny. Is this a bad idea.

Extras - I din't re-pot it or anything and haven't given it any fertizers yet. Should I be? If so, what kind.

Thanks in advance for all the help!

PS. The container is about 6" wide and the plant is about 7" tall and about 12" from flower to flower wide. Incese this information is needed.

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by RugbyHukr on February 08, 2006 06:06 AM
probably way too much water

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I love the sweet scents wafting in the breeze. I stop to admire the vibrant colors of all living things. And people think me odd. Then ODD I am!!!

http://community.webshots.com/user/flugnash
by FlowerNewbie on February 08, 2006 06:08 AM
How much water should I be giving it? [perplexed]

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by ShirlS on February 08, 2006 06:10 AM
I agree with Rugby on the watering issue!!! Way to much water. I don't think it is good for the plant for you to take it outside and leave it in the cold all day and then bring it back in. The plant is not dormant, and that hot to very cold, will shock it! Here is a link for you to read through so you can learn about the plants.

Planting & Care of Miniature Roses

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Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
by FlowerNewbie on February 08, 2006 08:49 AM
I read that website, and it seems to say to water daily when in container. Am I reading wrong? [nutz]

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by ShirlS on February 08, 2006 09:14 AM
Water daily yes. But 8oz is alot of water. try just keeping them moist. In the link I provided it said this about watering.

They love water and don't like to dry out, but they don't like wet feet. . Good luck with them. When I was back In Ontario I put the mini's in my garden outside and they came back bigger and better every yr.

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Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
by FlowerNewbie on February 08, 2006 09:52 AM
Ok. Another question, how do you know when you need a larger container?

The container that it is in now is about 6" wide and the plant is about 7" tall and about 12" from flower to flower wide. Since the plant is bigger than the pot does that mean it is time to move it. Also, I don't have any outside space to plant them so I will have to keep it indoors. Do you think it is better not to move it at all or the little sun during the day outweighs the damage from moving it?

Also when I have watered it the water seems to kindof come in and out the bottom just as fast. It seems this is good so as not to have extra water sitting at the bottom. If not, how much would you say to try 4 oz?

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by ShirlS on February 08, 2006 11:04 AM
Hi again Newbie,

If I were you I would gently tap out the plant and see if it is root bound. Sounds like it could be, from your description of the water running through. If it is, re-pot it into a container 1 size up. In Many cases there is not enough light ( even in a window) to keep a mini rose bush thriving inside. Here is what I would do. I would get a tray with some pebbles in it. Add some water over the pebbles and set the plant on the pebbles. That will take care of the humidity requirements ( with it being winter). I would repot the plant if it is root bound also. I woudl water it just enough to keep it moist. The plant should be near a window where it gets good light all day, and then some extra at night. I would not be moving it to and fro. Once the weather is nice you can put it out on your balcony ( after frost danger) and it should do great out there during the summer too. I can't say 4 oz or 2 oz. I am a feel it kinda gal. If it feels moist I leave it be, if it needs watering I generally just give it enough to moisten it.

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Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
by FlowerNewbie on February 08, 2006 02:01 PM
Okay, well I read your message and couldn't bear the idea of asking you what root bound meant or how to tell or how to unbind [Embarrassed] . So instead I searched and searched till I found this article web page . So at midnight there I was at my dining table trying to re-pot a root bound mini rose plant [sleepy] . 1st thing after pulling it out of the pot it came into 2 pieces. From there all I could tell was it did seem like a whole lot of roots and they were really tight together. I had prepared 1/2 perlite and 1/2 potting soil and put about 2" of it at the bottom. I got rid of all the existing soil except that which was attached at the roots. Here's where it got very stressful [scaredy] . I didn't have any idea of what to do at this point because I was trying to loosen up the roots to get rid of the existing soil but it wasn't budging to much unless the roots were pulled apart. I wasn't sure how much of this behavior was acceptable [Eek!] . So I sat there and sort of massaged it back and forth till it started loosening. At this point the individual stems started separating, should this be happening? It felt like a bad horror film, "Massacre of the Roses [devil] ." Yet I continued till it was mostly apart. Then stuck it in the pot poured the rest of the soil mix in around it and patted it down. Some of the heavier roses were wanting to lean over a bit so I kinda just patted the soil around a bit more. After, I watered it because the soil was dry. It took a good amount of water to moisten. So in the end it looks actually quite attractive in its new home [grin] . My fear is did I just murder my roses? I guess it will only take a few days to find out. Another thing I couldn't find the answer to is when taking off the flowers and leaves, how do you know which ones are "no good." I have a few that are a light green should I take those off, a lot of these are the new growths. For the blooms, when is it time to say goodbye?

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by tkhooper on February 08, 2006 03:43 PM
All thought I have heard of some people who are able to keep them alive inside normally they don't fair well inside. They are very suceptable to drafts and most windows have a heater underneath them that make the situation bad to worse. Outside they are very easy care and seem to do very well. Of the ones I've bought there are usually 3 to 4 plants in each pot. They fill out quite a bit in the garden and need to be given more room than they have in the pot.

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by RugbyHukr on February 08, 2006 10:59 PM
I think 'water daily in a container' is for outside containers.

I water my patio container plants daily unless it has been cold or rainy. I water my indoor plants much less frequently.

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I love the sweet scents wafting in the breeze. I stop to admire the vibrant colors of all living things. And people think me odd. Then ODD I am!!!

http://community.webshots.com/user/flugnash
by ShirlS on February 08, 2006 11:49 PM
I think you did fine with the re-potting. I suggest you place the plant where it is going to get the most amount of light and leave it to rest for awhile. We can kill them by overdoing things also. Any plant will lose a couple leaves here and there. That is normal. If they start dropping all over the place, then there is usually an issue. The rose needs to settle in to the environment now. You can pinch spent blooms off, once the bloom is dead.

[grin] on the asking what root bound meant. We have all been there! This is a wonderful place to ask questions. Everyone is really helpful.

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Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
by loz on February 09, 2006 12:21 AM
quote:
All thought I have heard of some people who are able to keep them alive inside normally they don't fair well inside. They are very suceptable to drafts and most windows have a heater underneath them that make the situation bad to worse. Outside they are very easy care and seem to do very well.
I totally agree with you tammy. I've had several mini roses and they have never done well inside for me....as soon as I can I plant them outside in the garden where they do somewhat better.....My moms have been the same way....she has a lot of them out in her garden.
by FlowerNewbie on February 09, 2006 12:30 AM
Well,

Thanks guys, but there's not much I can do since I do not have any garden space available. So I'll have to try and hope for the best! [Cool]

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by FlowerNewbie on February 09, 2006 12:31 AM
I will keep it on my table though so as not to have it around the heater. Pretty soon though I won't have them on at all and should be okay as far as that goes

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by Cricket on February 09, 2006 08:51 AM
Roses are difficult to keep indoors, primarily because of their light requirements. Provide as much direct sunlight as possible. I wouldn't recommend daily waterings because that will lead to root rot. Instead water the entire surface of the soil thoroughly until a little water runs through the drainage holes, then wait until the top 1/2" of the soil dries out before watering thoroughly again. New growth is frequently a paler shade of green; if the color doesn't deepen with age or if older growth pales, it is likely that the plant isn't getting enough light. Don't be too disappointed if the plant doesn't flower again indoors.

Unfortunately, repotting the rose was not the best idea. Most plants actually do better when they are rootbound and many flowering plants will not bloom unless they are rootbound. You can't tell by plant size in proportion to pot size that it is time to repot. It isn't necessary to repot unless you need to water more frequently than every 2-3 days. While your plant is acclimating to environmental changes in your home from ideal greenhouse conditions in which it was grown, plant growth slows and roots might even shrink (which means they need less water), which is why it is never a good idea to repot a newly acquired plant. Best to leave it alone for a few months to adapt to your home before introducing any other changes. I hate to be a pessimist but certain plants, roses being one, are sold as indoor plants to an unsuspecting public when they should really be labelled "disposable". It's worth a try but don't be too disappointed if you don't succeed. Best of luck with your rose!
by FlowerNewbie on February 09, 2006 08:57 AM
[tears] Well, I guess it'll be like a great one night stand. Good while it lasted but over to soon. [Wink] I guess it's a good thing I didn't listen when someone told me to pick all the flowers off to allow it to re-bloom. [Frown]

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by Cricket on February 09, 2006 09:19 AM
quote:
Well, I guess it'll be like a great one night stand. Good while it lasted but over to soon.
[lala] [Big Grin]

I think your friend was referring to removing dead blooms, a practice commonly known as "dead heading" which can prolong the blooming period by delaying seed production. I don't know if that applies to indoor plants which don't go to seed unless they have been pollinated.
by FlowerNewbie on February 09, 2006 09:24 AM
Actually he was saying to remove "ALL" blooms. I just couldn't do it. HE said it would allow for new fresh blooms to come quicker and to allow the plant to be less shocked from re-potting since it wouldn't have the blooms to take care of. At least my african violets got here today, on to better things, lol. The will grow indoors, right? They'd better!

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Kitten in Life  - , Tiger in Love  -
by weezie13 on February 09, 2006 09:26 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Cricket:
I hate to sound pessimistic but certain plants, roses being one, are sold as indoor plants to an unsuspecting public when they should really be labelled "disposable". Best of luck with your rose!
I agree totally...
Those plants/roses' are not hardy for outdoors in the colder climates either and so many people will try to plant them up and leave them outside,
and they struggle...
They seem to be the plant for first effects are beautiful, but long lasting they aren't...
(at least here in my growing zone 5, never had much luck with those super market roses')

I will say, I did buy some mini rose's from QVC when they had Springhill Nurseries on it, *I think it was that name* and ordered 12 mini's for $19.95 plus s&h... they were EXTREMELY hardy!!!
Still have those too..

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by rogmee on February 09, 2006 09:49 AM
It's not all gloom and doom. I have a couple that I'm overwintering in the little dungeon of a shed I use. I brought them into the shed in October. By the middle of December they looked really bad. Almost all the leaves had dropped and they pretty much looked like green stalks sticking up from the pot. As someone else on this forum said "If it's green it's not dead." So I just kept caring for them and as the days got longer they started to produce new leaves. Now they are full of new green growth and I'm sure that blooms will follow with warmer weather and stronger sun.
by tkhooper on February 09, 2006 10:19 PM
Yep right now mine are red with the new growth also comming in red. Mine are planted in the garden and I expect good things from them this year. I have the red variety and look forward to adding the other colors as they come in and my budget allows. I harvested about 50 seeds from it last year and look forward to more as time goes on. I know that standard roses can take 4 months to grow from seed and that miniatures are suppose to mimic their big brothers so that's going to be one of my experiments next winter.

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