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Invasive plants and vines

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
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by netwiz on May 13, 2006 07:24 AM
I'm having some trouble with a few invasive plants on my new property. We have honeysuckle (the vine type), wild roses and virginia creeper - all of which have been allowed to grow unchecked and out of control. The virginia creeper is even sprouting in the middle of our lawn.

The property is 5 acres of woodlands with 1 acre of cleared land. I would like to get rid of as much of these pests as I can without destroying the rest of the trees and plants. I'm sure I can't get rid of everything in the wooded areas but I would like to thin it out at least and gain a little control.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

Joanne
by Frisha on May 13, 2006 07:59 AM
Only thing I have found to work is alot of work :-/ clippers weedeaters saws...We have teh honeysuckle bushs and vine here and that blasted sourvine. So everyyear have to cut pull toss dig *sighs* Just make sure you dispose of everything you get loose or it could reroot. Afraid if I spray anything it'll lible to kill the other stuff too so would say just start in one area and start working slowly around the area. Had some poision ivy vine sprout this spring not sure how to get rid of it yet though thinking an old pair of gloves the trash can and tossing the gloves after I pull it so that the oils don't get on anything else.
by netwiz on May 13, 2006 09:26 AM
We've had some luck with pulling up the poison ivy. My husband uses the thicker plastic gloves over his gardening gloves. He also makes sure to dress in long pants and shirt and puts Ivy Block on his face and neck. He soaks the area with the vines and slowly pulls it out, trying not to break it. Puts the vines in a plastic bag for trash removal and takes a shower using special ivy remover. Thank goodness he has the guts to do it... I won't get anywhere near it!

Joanne
by The Plant Doc on May 13, 2006 09:55 AM
If you can spray with out hitting desirable plants you can use a contact killer such as Ortho's weed be gone or Brush be gone.

If you have vines comeing up in your lawn try the weed b gone, it will work without hurting the lawn.

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Mike Maier
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The Plant Doc
by tkhooper on May 14, 2006 01:01 AM
I find the best way to use brush be gone is to get a cardboard box and cut the bottom out of it so I have a little fence and then put it over the weed and spray that way. The wind doesn't catch the weed killer that way and spread it around. Hope I described that well. I'm not very good at describing things.

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by netwiz on May 14, 2006 01:45 AM
I'm tempted to try the Brush-b-gone. Will the plants be easier to pull up once they are dead? My only concern is my husbands tendency to over do things. Rather than spray a little and see if it worked, he soaks everything in his path and shrugs when the wrong things end up dead. Maybe the cardboard will help eliminate that.

I'll keep you updated and thanks for the help!

Joanne
by The Plant Doc on May 14, 2006 06:16 AM
Then you may not want to go that route as if you over do the brush or weed be gone it could wind up killing the soil for a while and not allowing anything to grow.
You should always follow the directions on the label and the amounts they say to mix. They are there to ensure you do the best job possible, while protecting you and the environment.

TK that is a fantastic idea for preventing drift with the BBG! Much better then using one piece of cardboard to act as a shield! [Smile]

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Mike Maier
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The Plant Doc
by tkhooper on May 14, 2006 12:04 PM
Thanks Mike, I always seem to get the swirling winds when I try to spray anything so this is what works best for me.

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by netwiz on May 16, 2006 03:50 AM
Thanks for the tip about the cardboard box. We did a little spraying this weekend and the box helped tremendously! My constant nagging about being careful of the other plants may have helped a little too [Embarrassed]

Joanne
by Sir Ts Princess on May 16, 2006 04:04 AM
I wish you luck on reclaiming your yards. However, I LOVE wild roses, and all of mine got "ate" by a tornado last year...have no idea WHERE it went. Are you sure it didn't go to your house?? [lala] We found with our property that cutting, pulling, and burning fence rows was the best we could do. We were over ran with "vines" of all sorts...but only ONE wild rose. Honeysuckle can be atrocious as far as how quickly it can return and once again overtake things. Best of luck! [Smile] Ali

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by tkhooper on May 16, 2006 04:23 AM
I have the mimosa trees and they drive me nuts. Bush be gone does not work on them at all. Neither does drilling holes in them and putting plugs of salt in the holes although you have to give me an a for effort. Supposedly prolonged cold will kill them if they are small enough when it happens but since it didn't last year I am stuck with these silly things. I'm thinking that if I ever get the opportunity I'll get some of that stump burning acid and possible take out the entire wild area of the garden. The nasty neighbor likes to plant berry canes and strawberry and other invasive things over there just to give me kittens because of course he plants them but never takes care of them. Ok enough on that score.

Have you looked into the garden flame throwers? Some one had a link to those last year. Push come to shove that would get rid of the problem. And we've had enough rain lately you could problably even use it. Of course you would have to monitor hubby very carefully lol.

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by Sir Ts Princess on May 16, 2006 04:31 AM
Yes, Mimosa trees or horrid...and if anyone finds a way to kill these things...PLEASE let me know! hmm...garden flame thrower... [thinker] except that would kill the azaleas too... :/ But, I do agree, it would elimate your "brush" problem.

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by netwiz on May 16, 2006 06:33 AM
I cringe when I see the hubby with clippers, let alone a flame thrower!! My rhodies were just about ready to bloom and he decided they needed a good pruning. They are now half the size they used to be and every bud is gone except one or two. Luckily I caught him before he attacked the rhodies in the front of the house and they are now starting to bloom. His father was the same way and was forever destroying any bush or shrub he got his hands on.

Let's hope my hubby isn't a lost cause!

Joanne

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