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Miniature Roses

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by tkhooper on April 15, 2006 10:21 PM
I'm puzzled. My miniature roses bush has put up a stem that is many times the size of all the rest of it's stems and the stem shoots straight up above the rest of the plant by several inches before there are any leaves.

I have no idea if I should do something, leave it alone. Or what is going on. Can someone help me out please?

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by peppereater on April 15, 2006 10:42 PM
Hiya tk! How've you been?
That's peculiar. I'm not sure if miniatures are grafted or not...probably. If so, it could be a shoot off of the root stock. But if it's grafted, I would think the rootstock would be the dwarfing component, so it shouldn't send up a standard type shoot. Hmmmm.... It can't hurt anything to see what kind of rose it produces, but then again, it can't hurt to just prune it off. I'd be tempted to leave it and see what it does, but if it looks unruly, get rid of it. What color is your miniature rose? I love those, and mine give me no trouble at all...

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by tkhooper on April 15, 2006 10:51 PM
It's a lovely red color. I'm hoping that I can get a yellow one this year. I harvested the seeds from mine last yea and plant to do the same thing this year. Then instead of trading them one of these times I plant to grow some. Or at least try to lol. I wonder what I'll get if they are grafted. Should be an interesting experiment to while away the winter anyway.

Have you tried growing any of the miniatures from seed or from cuttings?

I think since it won't do any harm I'll just leave the extra large stem in place. I too am curious about what kind of bloom it may get.

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by peppereater on April 15, 2006 10:54 PM
I've never tried to grow one from seed or cuttings...I may look into growing them from cuttings, if they aren't grafted...hmmm...I'll try to look into that. If you find out anything about that, let me know. I wouldnt mind having a few dozen!

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by tkhooper on April 15, 2006 11:12 PM
Hey look what I found.

Pruning: Your rose can be pruned at any time of the year. You actually do this whenever you pick a flower. Don't allow long branches to develop on their own, but rather, keep the plant shaped as it grows. Remember, that by removing dead flowers as they occur you insure more continuous blooming. When your plant lose its leaves in the winter, do some heavy pruning by removing about 1/3 to 1/2 of the thinner branches, and cut the others back about the same amount. Sharp pruning will ensure good blooms the following year, because this will stimulate new growth, and the rose blooms on this new growth.

Ask and you shall receive lol.

Looky what I found:

Cuttings of miniature roses may be readily grown, even by an amateur. Select healthy cutting material to be cut from tip growth of the desired variety. Cuttings should be 2 to 4 inches long with two or more leaves. If a number are to be made they should be dropped into a can of water to keep them fresh.

In our own propagation all cuttings are first washed in water to which several tablespoons of Clorox have been added. They are then drained and immersed for a few moments in water containing 2 tablespoons of Orthocide per gallon. Then the cuttings are removed and placed in loose piles on the cutting bench until workers can poke them into the rooting medium. The base of each cutting is dipped into a hormone rooting powder such as Rootone.

The rooting medium may be clean sand, a mixture of sand and peat, all perlite or a mixture of equal parts of peat and perlite. We prefer the latter mixture which needs no sterilization. Mix the dry materials in a clean can, bucket or wheelbarrow then add enough water and Mix to wet thoroughly. Be sure you have sufficient drainage. All our cutting beds have 1/2 inch clean fine gravel and about 3 inches of rooting medium. A plastic pot or a clean tin can with drain holes makes a fine container for a few cuttings.

Cuttings must never be allowed to dry out. For this reason we root all cuttings under mist except during the winter when rooting is slower, the weather cool and cuttings do not dry out easily. Mist nozzles about 20 inches above cutting beds operate continuously during the day (on about I hour after sunrise, off about sundown) . Our misting beds are open to the sky and sun but are protected on the sides by a 3-foot high plastic or screen glass wall protection from wind. Otherwise mist could be blown away from cuttings on the windward side. For our own propagation we have been pleased with constant misting. Our air is quite dry and waste water is not a problem. Under other conditions you may find intermittent misting more satisfactory. If rooting is done indoors in a glass house, intermittent misting would certainly be best.

A small misting unit for home growers is easily made and may be used to root many kinds of cuttings. All you need is one mist nozzle connected to an upright piece of 1/2-inch pipe (wired to a stake to hold it in position) which is connected to a water hydrant with a length of ordinary garden hose. We suggest the so-called "Florida Type" or a similar nozzle such as we use, the Thompson #215 made by Thompson Sprinkler Co., Los Angeles, Calif.

Materials needed:

1 mist nozzle connected to tipper end of 1/2-inch pipe
1 1/2-inch ell
2 pieces 1/2-inch pipe 12 to 18 inches long
1 and 1/2 pipe-to-hose fitting
1 stake (wooden or old pipe)

Connect pipe and fittings together so that nozzle is at the top of one piece of pipe and the 1/2-inch pipe-to-hose fitting is at end of other piece of pipe (see Figure 16)

Connect to garden hose and you are ready to operate. Your bench or table can be made of scrap lumber.

Mist nozzles may be turned off while cuttings are being inserted in the bed. If flats or pots are used they may be set on a table while being filled with cuttings and then set under the mist unit. A knife, clean garden label or other tool may be used to make the opening or furrow into which cuttings are poked. We use a piece of sheet metal approximately 4 inches by 6 inches with all four corners rounded for safety. Under mist, cuttings should not be inserted more than one inch deep (thus we find short cuttings an advantage) and should be thoroughly, but gently, watered to settle the medium around all cuttings.

Under good growing conditions (warm, sunny weather) miniature rose cuttings will root under mist in about three weeks. Some kinds' take a little longer, some less. When rooting has taken place (cuttings will feel tight if gently tugged) the next step is to wean them from the mist. This is done by gradually shortening the hours under mist and providing longer and longer OFF intervals during the day. With us this weaning process takes about six or seven days. Cuttings may then be removed and potted or allowed to stay in cutting bench or flat until they can be potted.

If mist is not provided cuttings must be watered quite often all during the rooting process and some shading is very helpful. Cutting losses will usually be much higher and some varieties will be more difficult to root.

Still another method sometimes used in rooting cuttings is to slip the pot or can into a plastic bag which extends above the cuttings high enough to be tightly closed with a rubber band or a twist tie. Support the bag top with a stick or wire bow which can be made from an old coat hanger. Or the plastic bag may be slipped on from the top and tied around the can. For larger quantities of cuttings a nursery flat, including wood or wire bows for support, may be completely encased with a sheet of polyethylene film. When planted, cuttings should be thoroughly watered before covering. Little or no added water will be needed while cuttings are rooting.

Figure 16. Home misting unit for propagating miniature roses from cuttings

Rooted cuttings are usually first potted into 2 and 1/4-inch or 3 inch plastic or clay pots using the potting soil mix recommended earlier. When potted they may be set into a nursery flat or other tray for easy handling. Water plants thoroughly as each flat is filled and again after pots are set on the greenhouse bench or other growing area. When plants become well rooted and large enough they may be sold or planted out. If desired they may be moved into larger pots or other containers for growing.

By this time your cutting grown miniature rose should be blooming freely and we are at the point where We admire the flower and say, "How fast they grow!"

Climbers are started and grown the same way but when potting up it is usually better to start with a 3 inch pot.

Figure 17. Budding a miniature rose

Growing a miniature tree rose is a little more involved and usually takes extra skill, attention, and time. Step by step the growing of a miniature tree rose plant as developed through our research is is follows (see Figures 17, 18, 19) :

METHOD 1: Budding eyes of desired varieties are inserted along the growing branch (or cane) of a selected understock variety while yet attached to the plant. Each bud is tied with a rubber budding strip. We grow most of these as 10 inch standards which means that to allow 2 inches in the ground and a 10 inch stem above ground we need 12 inches from base of cutting to the bud. Two buds may be used but we feel that a single bud carefully pinched and trained makes a more satisfactory plant. Buds are placed along the understock cane at intervals of approximately 15 to 18 inches. As soon as buds have "taken" these canes are severed from the plant and made into cuttings. All eyes below the bud are removed with a sharp knife to prevent suckering. The understock we use is known as 'Pink Clouds' and grows much like R. odorata understock or R. multiflora It originated here as a seedling 'Oakington Ruby' (miniature) X multiflora. See Modern Roses VI.

Cuttings are now inserted into the rooting medium (usually under mist) and when rooted are potted into 2 and 1/4inch round peat pots. The "nurse" tops (from the eyes above the bud) are allowed to grow until the rooted cuttings are well established in the peat pots. At this stage we move plants into 5 inch pots (clay or plastic) . The nurse top is cut back and as the budded eye grows it is pinched several times to form a new well rounded top. Flowers are usually kept off to give more strength to the developing head. If possible the stub above the bud should stay on until the top is well grown, then cut off and sealed with a pruning or grafting compound such as "Treeheal" made by the Flintcoat Co. and available from seed and garden stores.

Figure 18. Budding a miniature tree rose

Advantages of this method are: (1) good straight trunk of uniform height; (2) well formed head; (3) fully established roots in pot enables sale or transplanting all year, not just during bare root season.

METHOD 2: This method eliminates the need for budding, but only certain varieties lend themselves to, this method. It is necessary to have sufficient stock plants of these varieties from which full length cuttings can be selected.

Figure 19. Budded miniature tree rose

Use cutting wood approximately 1/4 inch (lead pencil thickness) in diameter. A small head or top should already be formed at top of cutting. After the cutting has been selected and removed from the parent plant, trim and shape the head, leaving as much foliage on as possible. (See Figure 19.) Measure down from where the head starts to branch, then make a new cut for the base of the cutting. To make a finished miniature on a 10 inch trunk, the stem or trunk should measure 12 inches. This allows for two inches of the trunk which will go into the soil. Carefully remove all eyes below the head as suggested in the first method. Immerse cuttings in a Captan (Orthocide) solution. Dust the base of each cutting with Rootone (hormone) powder before sticking it into the rooting bench or container. We mist the cuttings as needed until rooting occurs. Then they are transplanted as suggested for budded cuttings.

Advantages are the same in this method as in Method Number One. Disadvantages are: limited propagation material; extended time over which a number of cuttings must be taken; and difficulty of rooting certain varieties.

During the past two seasons I have hastened the rooting process by adapting a wounding process to the base of these cuttings. Immediately after making the cuttings I wound the base of each of them by cutting in several vertical slits.

I think I just have to try this once my miniatures get a little bigger. It's sounds like such fun.

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by peppereater on April 15, 2006 11:40 PM
Wow, tk, thanks! I'll be doing this soon...
Man, only thing is, I would never touch that Orthocide. I guess it's helpful on a commercial scale, but that stuff is toxic.

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by tkhooper on April 16, 2006 02:08 AM
I don't think it would be necessary for a home gardener like us. I mean we keep much better watch on our stuff to make sure it doesn't get sick or infected and would never take a cutting from a suspect plant right? Let me know how it goes and any hints or tips about doing this and maybe I'll get so excited I'll try it too. Wouldn't that be great. Then we could trade cuttings. We aren't a long way away for the post office we could probably do any overnight trade so they would get here nice and fresh. Would something like that work? Of course I'd have to pay for the postage since I only have one color to trade so far. I'm so excited. I've got the cart way before the horse lol. But I do love the miniature roses. I have since the first time I saw them and began killing them trying to keep them indoors. I've since learned my lesson on that one. They go outside as soon as I get them home.

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by tkhooper on April 18, 2006 09:23 PM
That tall stem was taunting me. So today it became my first ever miniature rose cutting. It is now sitting on top of my refrigerator will rooting hormone on it's bottom lol. I am so excited. It's hard to see the branch but it's to the right on the picture.

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by tkhooper on April 21, 2006 10:06 AM
Well the miniature rose cutting recovered from the wilt it experienced the first day and now is looking ok. I'm excited. I hope it works out. I have several other branches that are taller than the plant ingeneral that could be taken as cuttings if this first one works.

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by owlette on April 24, 2006 05:21 PM
This sounds pretty easy. Think I will give it a try too!
thanks for all the details.
Owlette
by tkhooper on April 25, 2006 01:44 AM
your very welcome owlette. mine is into day 7 and still hanging in there so I have hope. And I'm starting to give my miniature rose outside a really good look with the idea of taking more cuttings if this one works. I'm very excited.

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